ICEGOV2017 – ICEGOV2019
Conference theme

Building Knowledge Societies: From Digital Government to Digital Empowerment

New Delhi, India

7 - 9 March 2017

Summary

The full ICEGOV2017 conference website is available here.

Statistics

Submitted papers (560) and published papers (117).  

Ring chart of submitted vs accepted papers (ICEGOV2017).

Acceptance rate (21%) and rejection rate (79%). 

Ring chart of acceptance vs rejection rate (ICEGOV2017).

Proceedings

Rehema Baguma, Rahul De’, and Tomasz Janowski (Eds.). 2017. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Electronic Governance (ICEGOV2017). ACM Press, New York, USA. (ISBN: 978-1-4503-4825-6)

Rehema Baguma, Rahul De’, Tomasz Janowski, and Morten Meyerhoff Nielsen (Eds.). 2017. ICEGOV2017 Special Collection: e-Government Innovations in India (ICEGOV2017 SCII). ACM Press, New York, USA. (ISBN: 978-1-4503-4930-7)

Cover of the ICEGOV2017 proceedings.Cover of the Indian Special Issue.

Accepted Papers

#5
;  Anurag Mishra, Piyush Aggarwal, Rohit Chaudhary
ID
#5
Abstract

River pollution is a major problem in India in the present time. Google Maps provide us satellite view and terrain view of earth in India for most of the places. But we can’t get exact insights of pollution affected areas. The paper is about how we can distinguish and highlight the pollution affected areas on the banks of rivers, what remedies can be taken to check the pollution on that spot, and to help people to know better about the severe river pollution. Google Maps has a lot of information and one can crawl the Google Maps to have very useful results. Our basic idea is to make a tool which may be helpful in identifying the causes and more polluted areas of the river and to give the correct remedies and suggestions to control the river-pollution of corresponding areas. The paper focuses on the problems that we face and can face in the near future like dangerous diseases, etc. This paper presents a detailed methodology of identifying the cities on the river banks along with their status of pollution as severe or moderate.

Keywords
CPCB; Pollution Index; Latitude-Longitude; API’s; Markers
Authors
Anurag Mishra, Piyush Aggarwal, Rohit Chaudhary
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#38
;  Eriks Sneiders, Jean Claude Byungura, Martin Henkel, Erik Perjons
ID
#38
Abstract

Language technology can improve the efficiency and quality of the services provided by public organizations, first of all, the communication with citizens. So far, this has been investigated in the context of Western countries. We do not know, however, how beneficial such application of language technology could be for the so called developing countries. In order to find this out, we explored the communication between ten public organizations and the citizens in Rwanda. We discovered about 20 communication channels; 12 of them could benefit from various applications of language technology. Furthermore, we explored the potential of language technology for analysis of digital communication in order to better understand the citizens’ needs and opinions and, hereby, increase the level of e-participation, participatory decision and policy making.

Keywords
Language Technology; Communication Channels; Participatory Decision and Policy Making; E-Participation; Government 2.0; ICT for Development
Authors
Eriks Sneiders, Jean Claude Byungura, Martin Henkel, Erik Perjons
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#40
;  Edgar Alejandro Ruvalcaba Gómez
ID
#40
Abstract

The role of the concept Open Government (OG) has been key promoting transparency, participation and collaboration in public administration worldwide. At  the same  time,  it  is  now  the moment  to  generate  data  that  allow  us  to  understand  the  measures  adopted. Diverse  research suggests that OG contributes to creating better conditions for political and social dialogue, normative frameworks to be translated into laws and regulations,   organizational   change   in   public administrations,  as  well  as  the  creation  of  software,  applications  and  useful  processes  for  citizens[1][3][4][7][18][29][30]. At  the  same  time,  it  is  unclear the  scope  of  concept  or  its relationship with other areas of public policy (like transparency, participation, e-government, social media, open data, etc.) [8][32]. This paper presents a research about the Open Government  (OG)  phenomena  in  Spanish  municipalities over  50,000  inhabitants (146  municipalities),  using  a  questionnaire.  Particularly the research objective of this study is looking at the perceptions of city managers responsible of OG policies in order to understand more about this emergent public policy in the local layer of government. In order to achieve this purpose, the following research question has been raised: What is the perception of those who manage OG about this concept? The  results  are  consistent  with  a  notion  of  OG  associated  to  terms  like transparency  or  access  to  information,  and  less  to  collaboration, co-production, technologies  or electronic  government.  Also,  the  results  confirm  the  intention  of  city managers  to  promote transparency   or   access   to   information   with   OG   policies,   while   other   possible   outcomes (collaboration,  managerial  improvements  or  reduction  of  management  costs)  are  less  popular.

Keywords
Open government; public policy; adoption; city managers; survey research; Spain
Authors
Edgar Alejandro Ruvalcaba Gómez
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#55
;  Cíntia Caldas Barcelar de Lima
ID
#55
Abstract

The growth in the use of smartphones has caused major changes in communication, including new forms of interaction between governments and citizens. The high penetration of these devices, even in developing countries, creates opportunities for the realization of m-government actions such as the provision of public interest apps. However, there are a number of factors that need to be considered for these tools to become really effective to promote citizenship. This paper describes research conducted to identify the limits and possibilities of the use of these apps for citizenship in Brazil. For this study, 98 apps available to Brazilian citizens were analyzed in relation to technical and qualitative aspects. It also analyzed the institutional environment and policies related to the theme. The results showed that these apps have been used in Brazil as an additional way of providing information, but are under used in promoting citizenship through public service provision or citizen participation.

Authors
Cíntia Caldas Barcelar de Lima
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#56
;  Luis Terán, Ulzhan Kakenova, Edy Portmann
ID
#56
Abstract

Voting advice applications (VAA’s) are interactive online tools that have become extremely popular in electoral campaigns. They are developed to assist voters by enhancing the basis on which they decide how to vote. Typical VAA’s do this by matching users’ policy-preferences with the positions of parties and/or candidates. Nowadays, VAA’s are able to attract huge numbers of respondents and to provide a significantly rich source of mass public opinion data. However, not all parties or candidates provide their positions regarding the statements revealed in the VAA platform in order to derive recommendations for users. The majority of candidate profiles are constructed using expert analysis, extracting the position of parties and/or candidates from different data sources, such as interviews, speeches, and discussions, among others. This type of profile generation is time-consuming and sometimes arguable, which may lead to mismatching or biased results. Therefore, it is important to find a dynamic approach for building candidate profiles. In this paper, the authors propose a so-called VAA 2.0, which generates dynamic profiles of politicians by extracting their attitude toward policy-issue statements from their official Twitter accounts. The VAA 2.0 works with the Twitter API, a directional model for matching algorithm, an affective norm for English words (ANEW) library, the cumulative distribution function, and the probability density function for sentiment analysis.

Keywords
Voting Advice Application; Recommender System; Dynamic Profiles; Probability Distribution Function; Sentiment Analysis
Authors
Luis Terán, Ulzhan Kakenova, Edy Portmann
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#69
;  Gayatri Doctor, Esha Dalal
ID
#69
Abstract

Smart Cities are defined in various ways by different people, but all have an underlying concept that being “smart” involves using information and communication technologies (ICT), the internet to address urban challenges.   The rapid growth in use of computers, electronic devices and gadgets in today’s urbanized world, leads to more production, consumption and generation of Waste Electrical or Electronic equipment (WEEE) or E-Waste.

E-Waste is a hazardous waste, thus there is a challenge to manage it and its proper disposal. The authorized E-waste recycling facilities in India capture only 3% of total E-waste generated; the rest makes its way to informal recycling yards in major cities like Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore.

Ahmedabad is selected among the first 20 Smart Cities in India under the Smart Cities Mission, Ministry of Urban development (MOUD), Government of India (GOI). Ahmedabad also ranks sixth among the top ten Indian cities generating E-waste.

The paper describes a study of the existing scenario of e-waste management; the level of awareness in the people for the disposal of e-waste by surveying the formal and informal sector, consumers/end-users, small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) in the city of Ahmedabad.

Keywords
e-Waste; e-Waste Management; e-Waste Awareness; Smart City; Ahmedabad
Authors
Gayatri Doctor, Esha Dalal
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#70
;  Ajay Dutta, M. Syamala Devi, Manish Arora
ID
#70
Abstract

Citizen information needs depend on central data warehouse integrated with state level and central level e-Governance applications. Data integration presents core issues like interoperability, technical heterogeneity and flexibility. Census Web Service is an open standard based Web application that interacts with other web applications for the purpose of sharing citizen data. This will help in using uniform and consistent census data across various e-Governance applications. This paper presents a census data integration mechanism based on the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) with various e-Governance applications. The proposed architecture consists of three layers; Web Service Provider, Service Broker and Web Service Consumers. Web Service providers publish services to a service broker. Web Service Consumers find required services using a service broker and bind to them. These layers are implemented based on a set of standards including EXtensible Markup Language (XML), Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), Web Services Description Language (WSDL) and Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration (UDDI) to deal with technical heterogeneity. A prototype of the framework is implemented and validated with e-Governance applications for issuing Caste Certificate and Rural Area Certificate. It is concluded that census web service can be effective and efficient in all types of e-Governance applications as it can provide accurate and timely information within reasonable amount of time.

Keywords
census; e-Governance; platform independent web service
Authors
Ajay Dutta, M. Syamala Devi, Manish Arora
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#72
;  Anjali Kaushik
ID
#72
Abstract

Geo-spatial information is utilized in diverse socio-economic activity such as urban planning, land management, infrastructure development, natural resource management, disaster management and forestry etc. This study discusses the Geo-IT scenario in India which has seen significant policy, planning and implementation changes in the last few years. It discusses successful GIS-based initiatives in areas such as infrastructure development, watershed planning and management, forestry etc. The study goes on to describe the innovative use of technology in these areas, bringing transformation in terms of accountability, transparency, quality of service, pace of implementation, ownership by community members, monitoring, and more such areas. Increasingly, the Geo-IT planning is integrated with other development initiatives across various Government departments in the state based on thematic maps and an innovative approach.

Keywords
GIS; Decision Support Systems; Government; India
Authors
Anjali Kaushik
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#82
;  A B Sagar
ID
#82
Abstract

There are several reasons for social and economic exclusion of citizens and digital divide is one of the most important one. Digital divide is a social issue which denotes the varying amount of information between those who have access to the Internet (specially broadband access) and those who do not have access. Broadly speaking, the di?erence is not necessarily determined by the access to the Internet, but by access to ICT (Information and Communications Technologies) and to Media that the di?erent segments of society can use. It describes a gap in terms of access to and usage of ICT. It was traditionally considered to be a question of having or not having access, but with a global mobile phone penetration of over 95%, it is becoming a relative inequality between those who have more and less bandwidth  and more or less skills. In this modern world marked by a growing need for ICT skills at all levels, there is an increased need to bridge the digital divide. ICT is so tightly woven into the fabric of society today that its deprivation can rightly be considered one of twentieth century social deprivations, such as low income, unemployment, poor education, ill health and social isolation. To consider ICT deprivation as somehow less important underestimates the pace, depth and scale of technological change, and overlooks the way that di?erent disadvantages can combine to deepen exclusion. One of the most challenging tasks being faced by India is digital divide. This paper presents an approach which has been followed by district administration in the district of Alirajpur, Madhya Pradesh, India. The signi?cance of Alirajpur district is that it is the least literate district in the whole country. Average literacy rate of Alirajpur in 2011 is 36.10 compared to 31.10 of 2001 [1] [2]. It can be safely inferred that if positive results can be obtained in Alirajpur district, then it is very likely that better results can be obtained in any other district of the country.

Keywords
Social inclusion; digital divide; rural e-Governance
Authors
A B Sagar
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#86
;  Syed Ziaul Hasan, Eric Cadora, Mustafiz Rahman, Adam Stapleton, Promita Sengupta
ID
#86
Abstract

The Bangladesh Constitution guarantees human rights and freedom, equality and justice and rule of law for all citizens. Article 33(1) ensures the rights for each citizen to consult with and be defended by a legal practitioner and article 35(3) affirms that every person accused of a criminal offence shall have the right to a speedy and public trial. The existing policy framework of the Bangladesh Government also emphasizes good governance. The Government in association with various national and international partners is wholeheartedly working to achieve its commitments in the Constitution, legal and policy framework.

However, the criminal justice system in Bangladesh is still facing considerable challenges. Bangladesh Courts have millions of cases backlogged and prisons are over 200% of capacity. Approximately 70% of prisoners have not been convicted of any crime and many are poor and vulnerable, lacking legal representation or knowledge. Numerous reports and articles over the last decade have pointed to a wide range of shortcomings. Few people would dispute the need to reform the criminal justice system. Whilst good efforts have been made in many institutions, the interdependencies within the system call for a more holistic reform strategy. A consensus view is that ‘Doing Nothing is not an Option’.

Before embarking on a process of reform, the Bangladesh government has determined to establish what is happening in the justice system, where are the gaps in services and blockages to effective delivery of these services. Accordingly it commissioned a Justice Audit of the criminal justice system in five districts. This Experience paper sets out how government, through the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, and with the support of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and the Department for International Development (DFID), went about this Justice Audit, what it found and what it did with the findings.

Authors
Syed Ziaul Hasan, Eric Cadora, Mustafiz Rahman, Adam Stapleton, Promita Sengupta
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#95
;  Paul Kariuki, Lizzy Oluwatoyin Ofusori
ID
#95
Abstract

At a time when global economic climate is becoming harsher for the majority of people worldwide, accessing credit for entrepreneurship is becoming challenging for most people, especially young people. By their very nature, young people lack the necessary collateral that financial institutions require in order to grant credit. This situation calls for innovative ways to raise the necessary capital for any business venture. A developing country like South Africa, with a high unemployment rate, young people are pressed to explore alternative ways to create their own jobs. Stokvels are known to provide credit with less strict conditions compared to mainstream banks. WhatsApp has significantly altered the stokvel landscape. Young people have discovered alternative means of accessing soft credit to enhance their own economic power. This new trend offers an exciting field of investigation for development practitioners, researchers and policy makers. This research project explored mobile phone practices amongst ‘young entrepreneurs from townships’ in the informal business sector in Durban, South Africa. It relied on in-depth interviews with selected young entrepreneurs in order to understand better this emerging trend of accessing credit via WhatsApp. From this research, the study found out that young people preferred WhatsApp-operated Stokvels because they were easily accessible, the money needed was available on the same day within hours of request and no strings attached to the lending because lending was done on the basis of mutual trust and commitment to the stokvel. From this study, it is evident that mobile technology is a catalyst for youth entrepreneurship. Mobile platforms such as WhatsApp are instrumental in enabling financing of young entrepreneurs to realize their dreams whilst at the sametime addressing the chronic challenge of youth unemployment in the country.

Keywords
Youth; Entrepreneurship; Mobile Phones; WhatsApp; South Africa
Authors
Paul Kariuki, Lizzy Oluwatoyin Ofusori
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#107
;  Swapnil Shrivastava, Supriya N Pal
ID
#107
Abstract

In the recent times we have been seeing a fundamental shift from Enterprise Applications towards large scale Enterprise Service Ecosystems. Enterprise Service Ecosystems are developed by modularizing and bundling of individual business rules and functions in the form of services. These services are loosely coupled, distributed and heterogeneous components which orchestrate amongst themselves in a seamless manner. Ecosystem components record the events that are related to the activities performed by them. These components could span across Data Centre, Cloud Infrastructure and Internet of Things. Aadhaar Authentication Ecosystem and e-Governance Service Exchange are examples of Enterprise Service Ecosystems which recently emerged in national e-Governance scenario. A Big Data Analytics Framework for comprehensive mining and analyzing event data of Enterprise Service Ecosystems is proposed in this paper. The offered framework facilitates interesting real time analytics (e.g. Process Conformance Checking, Bottleneck Detection) as well as performing offline analytics (e.g. Process Discovery). The application of the proposed framework for real time analytics is explained using Aadhaar (Unique Identity) Authentication Ecosystem case study.

Keywords
Enterprise Service Ecosystem; Event Data; Process Mining; Graph Analytics; Complex Event Processing; Aadhaar Authentication Ecosystem; Big Data Analytics; e-Governance
Authors
Swapnil Shrivastava, Supriya N Pal
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#110
;  Andrei V. Chugunov, Yuri Kabanov, Yuri Misnikov
ID
#110
Abstract

E-participation is a two-way process, comprising government-led projects and citizens’ initiatives. Although the cooperation between them is the best outcome, they usually compete for popularity and efficiency, representing conflicting views on engagement. In this paper, we aim to determine factors influencing the outcome of such competition. We analyze the sources of portals’ viability as separate initiatives and the possibilities for their convergence and cooperation. We take the case of St. Petersburg (Russia), where public authorities and civic activists have created two e-participation platforms to address the same issues of urban development.

Our main argument is that the viability of portals is based on their institutional basis. Our findings suggest that while the government – sponsored initiative is a formal institutional innovation with strong political support, it is unlikely to sustain changes in the bureaucratic process without political leadership. The civic initiative does not create new laws, but develops online community, contributing to new social norms. When the former is winning the competition in the short-term, the latter has a strategic advantage. Co-existence and “forced cooperation” is the most possible future here, as the institutional environment forces the government and activists to cooperate despite the escalating conflict. A rational choice by citizens, whose alternative suits their interests best, will also determine the future of the portals, but is shaped by the abovementioned conditions.

Keywords
e-Participation; e-Government; new institutionalism; social media; civil activism; urban development; comparative research
Authors
Andrei V. Chugunov, Yuri Kabanov, Yuri Misnikov
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#142
;  Vashima Shubha
ID
#142
Abstract

The paper submits that an outcome oriented capacity development intervention would be the key deciding factor for taking India through Digital transformation. In absence of relevant competencies and adequately trained manpower, the momentum and progress of ambitious Digital India initiative will not reach its intended outcome. There is an urgent need for bridging the talent gap between the industry standard and Public sector. E-Governance Competency Framework developed by Ministry of Electronics & IT (MeitY), Government of India is a step in the right direction. This article looks at the capacity development need for digital India and the significant role that competency framework with the objective of – ‘Deploy right & Develop right’ can play in creating a level playing field for Public sector to meet Industry and global standard. The sections in the article look at the problem statement, international perspective, overview of the framework, recommendation for usage and adoption, issues and challenges and the summary.

Keywords
Competency Framework; Skill & Capacity Building; Governance and Technology; Digital India; Transformation; HRM
Authors
Vashima Shubha
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#147
;  Manas Ranjan Patra, Amar Ranjan Dash
ID
#147
Abstract

Over the years, there has been steady increase in tele-density of developing countries which has enabled citizens to access digital services offered by their governments. This has not only reduced the digital divide but has become instrumental in realizing m-Governance to a large extent as more and more people have access to cell phones at an affordable cost. In keeping with the “Digital India” campaign to empower the citizens by ensuring that government services are made available through online infrastructure and Internet connectivity, a plethora of digital services are being delivered through government portals. But, this can have a real impact when common people can access government portals easily, irrespective of their age, culture, disabilities, literacy level etc. The accessibility of web portals largely depends on the design of portals as well as the web-browsers being used for the purpose. In this paper, we have critically analyzed the accessibility features of fifteen commonly used web browsers for android mobile phones with respect to the UAAG 2.0 international standards. The findings thereof, can guide the designers to improve upon the design of cell phone browsers by taking care of the deficiencies. The overall objective is to develop user-friendly web browsers for cell phones enabling diverse user groups to access a wide range of m-Governance services with ease.

Keywords
Web Accessibility; m-Governance; UAAG2.0; User Agent; Web Browser
Authors
Manas Ranjan Patra, Amar Ranjan Dash
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#166
;  Harish Kumar, Somender Poonia, Mohamed Iliyas
ID
#166
Abstract

The emergence of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has provided an easy, effective, economic and efficient way to provide various government services and welfare schemes at grass root level. Indian government is also moving towards e-governance, via use of ICT. But, India is a country with huge diversity. As per Socio Economic Caste Census (SECC) 2011, rural India accounted 73 percent of households. People living in these household are having poor literacy rate and not much aware of government’s initiatives for upliftment of their lives. These people are engaged in cultivation, casual or manual labour. Lack of awareness, access to ICT and shabby Digital Literacy is preventing them from availing various government schemes and creating the problem of Digital Divide. We carried out a survey to study these reality checks at the ground level and suggested a solution model for bridging the gap of Digital Divide in rural India.

Keywords
Digital Inclusion; Transparency; Accountability; Responsiveness; e-Governance; Rural Population
Authors
Harish Kumar, Somender Poonia, Mohamed Iliyas
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#195
;  Shina Panicker, Rishabh Srivastava
ID
#195
Abstract

India is at a cusp of revival as the world’s fastest growing big economy. Over the last decade, India has witnessed a multifold increase in government initiatives to digitally connect India from within and with outside world in order to promote economic growth and wellbeing in the country.  This advancement in ICT has created an explosive growth in digital data with almost every industry and business area digitizing their data ushering in the dawn of an era of big data in India. Financial frauds have emerged as an undesirable and inescapable byproduct of this economic growth with numerous chit fund and MLM companies coming under the scanner of government agencies such as SFIO, SEBI and ED for fraudulent activities. To combat the growing menace of fraud with clinching evidences present in the form of digital data, it has become imperative to develop tools and technologies to understand the massive amounts of digital data being collected by government agencies.

The paper focuses on various tools and technologies which are currently being used for fraud analysis. Further, it presents a fund flow algorithm that could be used to detect dubious fund transactions using bank transaction statements by analyzing the fund flow between various entities. It takes as input the bank transaction data of various parties of interest and generates as output a directed graph with nodes depicting the source and destination of fund transfer and directed arrows showing the direction of fund flow. Further, this paper focuses on the role of data analytics in understanding the massive volumes of digital data being collected by government enforcement agencies in combating financial frauds in India. The paper discusses the concerns and challenges based on complexities in data capturing, storage, analysis and visualization along with possible future directions.

Keywords
Big data Technology; Fraud; Digital Forensics
Authors
Shina Panicker, Rishabh Srivastava
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#214
;  Abhipsa Pal
ID
#214
Abstract

The global penetration of ubiquitous ICTs has given rise to a new model of production termed ‘peer production’ where thousands of volunteers collaborate with each other in an open project through the networked environment. Open content creation projects are a kind of peer production that involves contributors editing and sharing ‘content’. Motivation plays a major role in the content contributions since they are voluntary in nature. Motivations driving the contributors could be pro-social or personal-needs oriented. I propose to evaluate the motivations behind such contributions across countries, using a national cultural perspective. The propositions suggest, each of cultural dimensions [23] will have influences on the contributory behaviors differently. This has major implications in ICT4D since the cultural perspective shows different motivations that could drive contributors in the developing economies, leading to socioeconomic development.

Keywords
Open Content Creation; Peer Production; Open Development; Motivations; National Culture; Developing Economies
Authors
Abhipsa Pal
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#217
;  Gollapudi VRJ Sai Prasad
ID
#217
Abstract

Web is indeed prolific with useful content. However, some segments of the user population – for example, students of less rigorous colleges from rural India – may find some of the relevant material on the web complex, foreign and incomprehensible. So, while good content exists, not all are able to benefit from it. The intent of our research effort is to be able to make existing web content be more accessible to wider range of end-users who may have different sociocultural and cognitive abilities. We propose to overcome this gap at a Presentation Semantics level by developing a framework for renarration through Semantic Style Sheets. Using this framework, we facilitate the renarration of existing educational content to be used by thus far overlooked community of users.

Keywords
Semantic Transformation; Structured Documents; Mediated Systems; Web Accessibility; Web Personalization
Authors
Gollapudi VRJ Sai Prasad
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#224
;  Rajan Gupta, Sunil K Muttoo, Saibal K Pal
ID
#224
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and argue on the need of an assessment framework for the development of E-Governance services & practices in various states of India. This can be used to compare the states against each other so as to evaluate their status as per the national & international standards. The study is exploratory in nature as it develops arguments over an Index based on combination of theory, past literature and international reports w.r.t. E-Governance services and associated available infrastructure. It considers research papers from 2000-2015 and major reports on E-Governance after 2006. The need to develop an index based on different parameters is identified. The major areas to be covered up in the development index are online availability and performance of E-Governance service, telecommunication infrastructure, human capital, infrastructure availability and electronic participation by the citizens. Other areas are security and ease of access of the services. Development Index formulation will suggest that the development status for various Indian states, w.r.t. E-Governance, is based on lot of factors like the geographical location, demographic distribution, quality of human resources, and infrastructure present. A state merely having large number of E-Governance services does not become an automatic choice of best state for E-Governance development in the country. The state should be able to justify the overall development rather than being beneficial to just a small section of its population. Indian national E-Governance plan needs to assess the weak zones of the country so as to take initiatives to upgrade them and bid for overall higher ranking in the E-Governance Development Index of United Nations. There is no overall quantitative assessment framework available for E-Governance development in India as of now. So this research is novel with respect to E-Governance development and its assessment.

Keywords
E-Governance, National E-Governance Plan, E-Governance Development, Indian States Assessment Policy
Authors
Rajan Gupta, Sunil K Muttoo, Saibal K Pal
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#227
;  Ekta Sinha, Keith C. D'Souza
ID
#227
Abstract

This paper aims to understand the purposes for which  digitization is used by women in the Indian context and argues that digitization, per se, is not enough to empower women. In Indian culture, women have always taken the back seat in family decision making. Their life revolves around the family and fulfilling its needs. Today, the condition of women has improved as compared to yester-years but, due to lack of awareness, they still use very limited resources to empower themselves. The sample for this study has been taken from the economic capital of India, Mumbai, where Information & Communication Technology (ICT) and digitization are easily accessible. Despite the easy accessibility of ICT and digitization, this paper suggests that women in this city appear to have a limited purpose in using the internet or ICT.  ICT and digitization are largely used for online social interaction and entertainment.

This study finds that women are dependent on their family before and after marriage, for financial decision making. Online education does not depend on age and employment status, but on educational qualification and marital status. Thus, the study suggests that social and economic inequality exists and that they hinder capacity-building among women.

With the help of this study, one gains an understanding of the purposes for which women use available digital facilities. The findings  suggest that governments need to design and implement more interactive awareness programmes and policies for women to empower them through the effective and efficient use of the digital platform.

Keywords
Women Empowerment, Information & Communication technology, Digitalization, Social & Financial Inequality and Awareness
Authors
Ekta Sinha, Keith C. D'Souza
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#228
;  Pranab Ranjan Choudhury, Manoj Kumar Behera
ID
#228
Abstract

Demands for production and dissemination of reliable data is growing with increasing demand from public policies to monitor, compare and improve global and national developmental status and targets. Implementation of intentionally agreed commitments like Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Sustainable development Goals (SDGs) are influencing data production and availability, and the development of national statistical capacities. They also trigger challenges and opportunities in production of internationally comparable data to induce fair comparability among nations. Being a signatory to major international treaties, India has considerably improved data production, accessibility and availability over the years to ensure proper alignment of national level statistics and induce international comparison. However, very little efforts have been made to assess India’s progress around data production and dissemination around growingly important land governance. This assessment attempts to identify key opportunities and challenges at the country level to improve data availability, access, timeliness and quality.

India has made many progressive reforms around land laws and institutions to make land governance more inclusive and equitable; however its assessment with respect to global best practices through World Bank’s Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF) indicate the need of improvements around different land dimensions. Movement towards good land governance outcomes is incumbent upon robust and regular monitoring mechanism of land indicators across spatial (viz. administrative boundaries, land being a state subject in India) and temporal scales.

India has traditions of collecting, maintaining and reporting land information through nation-wide surveys, census, administrative and judicial reports/ databases. Its flagship program Digital India Land Record Modernization Program (DILRMP), has been supporting universal digitization of spatial and textual land records by the states. Together, these administrative and survey-derived datasets provide seamless opportunity for routine generation of data on key land indicators at low cost on a regular basis. Land is a state subject in India. Monitoring and reporting land-indicators at state levels would help in systematically discovering and identifying good practice that can then be documented and disseminated across states, manage change, and gradually move towards a more performance-based approach to improving land governance in India. However, there have been lack of institutionalized attempts, so far, to report land-indicators at national scale.

We have tried to assess the state of data in India, particularly to track and report two critical land governance indicators viz. women land rights and forest rights, critical to ensure equity and sustainability in terms of public policy. With UN’s SDG, defining similar indicators, we also attempt aligning them around SDG indicators. Status of these two parameters were analyzed using nation-wide datasets collecting whole population data, through legitimate institutions following robust processes and reporting them open access.

Census (human population) data and Forest Survey of India (FSI) data were used to assess village-wise forest areas eligible for recognition of rights under India’s historic Forest Rights Act, 2005. Using the FSI data and meta-analysis of census data, we calculated the estimated population (150 million including 90 million tribal) living in villages that have forest land within administrative revenue boundaries, potential area (40 million ha) that can be recognized under FRA and number of villages (0.17 million) that are eligible to initiate the claim. These data were made available across administrative boundaries of state, district and village, providing opportunities for relevant Government Ministries at Central and State level and civil society to expedite the forest rights recognition under India’s largest land reform process.

In order to assess women’s land rights (WLR) in India in the context of the SDGs, after examining the existing data sets, we used Agricultural Census data, conducted by Government of India every fifth year following the guidelines of World Census on Agriculture (WCA). Using Agricultural census data, we have developed atlas of women land rights (based on operational holdings) in India with state and district wise granularity with further disaggregation across ethnicity (caste) and other socio-economic parameters. The study also attempted to analyze the link between the inter-regional and temporal variability of WLR and relevant policies and legal-institutional frameworks among the states to see if the correlations can better inform public policy and also induce healthy competition among states to appreciate and follow best practices. This paper presents the process, methodology and results of the data-analysis for these two land indicators while delving into the scope and challenges of dealing with existing and upcoming big datasets in India to report the land governance indicators and the potential policy spinoffs.

Keywords
Big Data; Forest Rights; India; SDGs; Women Land Rights
Authors
Pranab Ranjan Choudhury, Manoj Kumar Behera
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#244
;  Judie Attard, Fabrizio Orlandi, Sören Auer
ID
#244
Abstract

Open data is increasingly permeating into all dimensions of our society and has become an indispensable commodity that serves as a basis for many products and services. Governments are generating a huge amount of data spanning different dimensions. This dataification shows the paramount need to identify the means and methods in which the value of data and knowledge can be exploited. While not restricted to the government domain, this dataification is certainly relevant in a government context, particularly due to the large volume of data generated by public institutions. In this paper we identify the various activities and roles within a data value chain, and hence proceed to provide our own definition of a Data Value Network. We specifically cater for non-tangible data products and characterise three dimensions that play a vital role within the Data Value Network. We also propose a Demand and Supply Distribution Model with the aim of providing insight on how an entity can participate in the global data market by producing a data product, as well as a concrete implementation through the Demand and Supply as a Service. Through our contributions we therefore project our vision of enhancing the process of open (government) data exploitation and innovation, with the aim of achieving the highest possible impact.

Keywords
value creation; data value network; data value chain; data demand; data supply; exploitation; innovation; impacts; open data
Authors
Judie Attard, Fabrizio Orlandi, Sören Auer
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#246
;  Parwez Ahmed Siddiqui
ID
#246
Abstract

Governments around the world have undertaken major initiatives to take advantage of the potential of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in policy decisions and economic planning. Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS) is one such ICT based initiative in financial operations to support management and budget decision, fiduciary responsibilities and the preparation of financial reports and statements. Conceptualization of an integrated system and its implementation in the State, extending over 67 Departments and over 150 Directorates and over 8000 Regional and field level offices down to the level of Block and embracing all financial operations, was a very challenging task. This experience paper depicts the challenges encountered, strategies adopted, Business Processes Re-engineered (BPR) by the Government of West Bengal in the process of implementation of IFMS, the benefits accrued to the Stakeholders and milestones achieved. The project may serve as an example to be followed, with improvisation to meet the specific regional requirement in other States of India and in other developing economies around the world.

Keywords
Integrated Financial Management System; IFMS; Human Resource Management System; HRMS; Business Process Re-engineering; BPR; e-Governance; G2G; G2C; West Bengal; India; Reserve Bank of India
Authors
Parwez Ahmed Siddiqui
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#248
;  Sayantan Khanra, Rojers P Joseph
ID
#248
Abstract

This study attempts to analyze the impact of demography and service quality on the adoption and diffusion of e-government services in the context of India. The objective of this paper is to study the users' perception about e-Government services and investigate the key variables that are most salient to the Indian populace. The outcome of the study could be used by government agencies in designing, updating, and promoting e-government services to enhance public participation leading to better efficiency, convenience, engagement, and transparency. At the completion of this study, a research model that would help understand the relationship involving the demographic variables and service quality dimensions, and the willingness to adopt e-government services in India is expected to be developed.

Keywords
Demographic variables; E-Government services; Hierarchical regression analysis; Service quality dimensions
Authors
Sayantan Khanra, Rojers P Joseph
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#253
;  Sagar K. Wadkar, Khajan Singh, Asif Mohammad, Shivaji D. Argade
ID
#253
Abstract

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are continuously emerging as key tools to support development activities undertaken by Governments, civil society and private enterprises. It has been showing significant result in addressing information asymmetry gap in many sectors and localities, especially in agriculture & allied sector. The rural people, specifically farming communities have been getting timely & relevant information, services & support, and farming inputs. However, the sustainability of these ICT based efforts in improving well-being of farming communities is key to the effectiveness of a rural ICT projects in India. The present paper aimed to determine the sustainability of the aAQUA (Almost All Questions Answered) e-Agriservice in Maharashtra state, western parts of India covering the four districts of the state. The study used the ex-post facto (cause to effect) research design in a quasi-intervention setting. The list of registered users was obtained from the service provider (presently Agrocom Software Technologies Pvt. Ltd.) and total of 120 users were selected randomly from four districts (30 users from each district). The sustainable-Agriservice Index (SeAGRSI) was computed based on the five dimensions viz. technological, economic, social, institutional, and political by using Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA), Mixed Method Approach and Normalized Rank Order Method (NROM). The study revealed that the SeAGRSI for the social indicators was the highest among other dimensions of the sustainability (SeAGRSI = 0.77) followed by the technologically (0.73), economic (0.71) political (0.62) and institutional (0.58) sustainable. It was also found that the mean SeAGRSI was 0.70 as reported by one third (32.50%) of the users, which means 70 per cent the aAQUA e-Agriservice was technologically, socially, economically, institutionally and politically sustainable.

Keywords
Dimensions of Sustainability; Rural ICT Projects; Sustainable aAQUA e-Agriservice Index
Authors
Sagar K. Wadkar, Khajan Singh, Asif Mohammad, Shivaji D. Argade
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#271
;  Chandni Agarwal, Akshath Singhal
ID
#271
Abstract

With the exponential development of electronics industry, smartphones have become a common commodity found with almost everyone irrespective of the age group providing easy access to Internet. While Internet proves to be one of the best sources for learning almost everything, an unguided exposure to it may pose serious security issues and even lead to hampering of children's growth. In our study we found that the Internet Security related problems have been on an all-time high in the past decade. It is also found that the most affected age group was 13-20 years of age and that in most cases the issues could have been avoided or atleast easily resolved if the family members of the cyber victims had been more aware. In India, cybercrime and victimization in the cyber space has remained a subject of great consternation, but lacks cognizance. This paper primarily focuses on digital awareness trends amongst people of various age groups and an initiative to help make society a safer place for everyone by providing a one-stop solution to the most commonly experienced Internet Safety issues in the form of free android app “Cyber Security Guide”. This paper also highlights the key features and benefits of app. Our paper will also encompass the following: (a)Objectives (b) Introduction (c)Need for Internet Safety and Digital Citizenship (d)Case Studies (e)Research on Students’ Problems (f)Development of CSAO (g)Probable solution to the problem (h)Salient Features of App (i)Response from our Users (j)Limitations (k)Conclusions and (l)Future Scope.

Keywords
Malware, Virus, Cyber Security, Cyber Bullying, Defamation, Pornography, Spyware, Ransomware
Authors
Chandni Agarwal, Akshath Singhal
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#277
;  Tupokigwe Isagah, Maria A. Wimmer
ID
#277
Abstract

The ubiquity of mobile devices has drawn new attention to the field of electronic government. Literature studies report on the significance of m-government, including its motivation, success, and failure in developed and developing countries. However, research on the design of m-government applications is still scarce. Design approaches in the literature lack a comprehensive way of addressing m-government challenges. This paper aims to (1) identify challenges of m-government in developed and developing countries and (2) investigate approaches used for designing m-government applications. The challenges are categorised based on the factors of PESTELMO and are further examined to identify requirements for suitable m-government design. Design approaches are analysed by the Content, Context and Process (CCP) framework and are examined to identify requirements, methods and guidelines addressed. The paper finally outlines research needs for a comprehensive design framework for m-government solutions and presents initial requirements for the framework.

Keywords
M-government, m-government challenges, m-government design, m-government requirements
Authors
Tupokigwe Isagah, Maria A. Wimmer
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#280
;  Rodrigo Sandoval-Almazan, David Valle-Cruz
ID
#280
Abstract

Public officials around the world are aware that solutions on public problems need a closer relation to citizens.  The era of a government in isolation that has all the answers is ending.  More and more co-production, collaboration and peer production concepts are emerging on public management conversations.  But there is very little evidence of these joint projects using technology.  Open innovation in governments is a recent research field in Mexico.  This paper reports the case of the use of open innovation in Mexico City’s transportation system, named Mapaton (large map), using gamification to engage citizens in order to map transportation routes using a smartphone App.  With the model Open Innovation Process Phases proposed by Mergel, we interviewed six persons – public officials, citizens, academics – from the Mapaton coordinator team.  We found that an innovation process is an iterative work and requires a preliminary stage of building trust between governments and citizens.  Also the result of this research argues that this combined effort will change.

Keywords
Open Innovation, Living Labs, Digital Government, Gamification
Authors
Rodrigo Sandoval-Almazan, David Valle-Cruz
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#283
;  Anna Picco-Schwendener, H. Jost Reinhold, Lorenzo Cantoni
ID
#283
Abstract

In recent years, many cities around the globe implemented Municipal Wireless/Wi-Fi Networks (MWNs) as part of their strategies towards becoming “smart” cities. While initial initiatives had very ambitious goals and often struggled implementing them, later projects were more limited in scale and scope. It became clear that understanding how existing MWNs are used is crucial in order to develop networks that satisfy expectations and needs of local residents and visitors. This will help building networks that are useful for the population at large and thus actively used. This study contributes to a better understanding of how MWNs are used and who their users are: to do so it analyses both network and user-provided data of the “WiFi Lugano” network, a MWN of a medium-sized Swiss city. With the help of cluster analysis, it identifies five different usage practices: two business-oriented ones – “E-mailer” and “Mobile-worker”, two tourism-oriented ones – “Tourism information seeker” and “Always-on traveler”, and one reflecting the practices of locals – “Local social networker”.

Keywords
Public Wi-Fi access, municipal wireless networks (MWNs), usage
Authors
Anna Picco-Schwendener, H. Jost Reinhold, Lorenzo Cantoni
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#285
;  Majed Ayyad
ID
#285
Abstract

In the lens of science and technology studies, we explore the non-deterministic and emergent properties of e-Government. In particular, we argue that e-Government is a socio-technical system and therefore we use a theoretical scaffolding platform and a meta-theory to understand the behavior of e-Government. Based on systems thinking modeling, we propose a new model to understand the dynamics and the continuous change of e-Government structures. Whether this change is endogenous or exogenous, the need for transformative strategies and better e-Government models is indispensable. The proposed model emphasizes that e-Government is not linear and changes over time and provides a methodology to find an answer to the difficult question “How does e-Government Work

Keywords
Actor-Network Theory; socio-technical systems; systems thinking; e-Government model
Authors
Majed Ayyad
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#286
;  Elahe Meydani
ID
#286
Abstract

All over the world, e-government initiatives try to combine Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to improve delivery of government services to their stakeholders. Government is being asked to provide public services in more efficient and accountable ways with high quality. Much attention has been focused on the processes, procedures, public and civil services, the policy making processes and their implementation. However, several surveys are reporting that ICT has a positive impact on government by automating the processes and reducing the cost and increasing time efficiency, etc., they are limited in case studies. While many studies have provided valuable facts about the role of ICT in government, there remains a strong need for studies with quantitative methods that can help to determine ICT’s position toward government effectiveness, which, according to World Bank captures the perception of the quality of public and civil services, the quality of policy formulation and implementation. This study attempts to explore and analyze the effect of ICT development on government effectiveness by engaging four statistical tests: Fisher-exact test, Chi-squared test, Likelihood test and F-test in on ICT data provided by the International Telecommunication Unit and government effectiveness data provided by World Bank.

Keywords
Digital Government, Good governance, Government effective- ness, Information and Communication Technology, E-government
Authors
Elahe Meydani
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#288
;  Nidhi Vij, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia
ID
#288
Abstract

Adoption of information and communication technologies (ICT) in governance contexts is considered empowering for governments and the citizens. Digital governance aims at transforming internal processes, structures and working practices leading to greater efficiency and transparency. Simultaneously, with open and digital governance accompanied by the Internet and other emergent technologies, the engagement between citizens and governments is expected to be greater than ever. However, it is not clear to what extent ICT initiatives are truly empowering citizens and government managers. In order to understand how ICT initiatives have been empowering citizens, we propose a conceptual framework and some preliminary findings. Based on a systematic review of recent literature, the framework should be useful for assessing the levels of empowerment produced or facilitated by different ICT initiatives. As an ongoing research, we also share some preliminary findings from selected ICT initiatives across India.

Keywords
Digital Governance; ICT Initiatives; Information; Inclusion; Integration; Influence; Empowerment; Emerging Topics
Authors
Nidhi Vij, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#291
;  Lina Marcela Morales Moreno, Jorge Iván Contreras, Javier Orlando Torres Páez
ID
#291
Abstract

In this paper, we present an initiative aiming at establishing a methodology for facilitating and promoting the adoption of the Colombian e-government strategy and the Colombian Government Enterprise Architecture Framework in the State. The methodology allows public agencies to discover the current situation of their highest-impact services, procedures and systems, propose a citizen-driven future state, and define a project portfolio for its implementation.

Keywords
e-Government; implementation methodology; enterprise architecture framework; IT management
Authors
Lina Marcela Morales Moreno, Jorge Iván Contreras, Javier Orlando Torres Páez
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#302
;  Agnes Owuato Odongo, Gideon Cheruiyot Rono
ID
#302
Abstract

Workplace harassment through ICTs is the use of Information and Communications Technology (ICTs) to harass, control, manipulate or habitually disparage individuals, business or group without causing physical harm [2]. ICTs workplace harassment requires the use of ICT and is verbal, sexual, emotional or social abuse of a person, group or organization. There is very limited existing research in this area. A literature review of research pertaining to workplace harassment using ICTs was completed. Findings indicate that workplace harassment through ICTs is becoming more prevalent as employees spend more time using technology that keep them connected to people during and after working hours. There are many different ways in which workplace harassment through ICTs reach their victims, and includes instant messaging over the Internet, social networking web sites, text messaging and phone calls to cell phones. ICTs harassment is a serious problem which can cause the victim to feel inadequate and overly self-conscious, along with the possibility of committing suicide due to harassment. The paper purpose is to research on workplace harassment through ICTs that continues to occur more frequently as technology becomes more readily accessible by the masses; and to explore ways of preventing it before it happens, and intervening after it has occurred.

Keywords
Workplace Harassment; Resilient; Workplace; Victim; and Trauma
Authors
Agnes Owuato Odongo, Gideon Cheruiyot Rono
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#334
;  Manji Nath, Pallabi Barah
ID
#334
Abstract

The purpose of this study is to find out whether digital technologies can reduce the existing gender inequality in Indian society. The current debate around digitalization is limited to the ones who have access and the ones who haven’t. But this paper takes the debate beyond access by suggesting a three-tier framework for measuring the impact of digital technologies on women empowerment. The Digital India programme run by Government of India is taken as a case study by the authors. Rather than depending on traditional methodologies to bring gender equality, can we consider Digital India as a potential solution? This paper explores the answer to the above question from a gendered perspective with the help of primary data analysis of a few selected Digital India products and services.

Keywords
Digital India; technology; gender; equality; women; framework; Digital Locker; MyGov; and empowerment
Authors
Manji Nath, Pallabi Barah
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#337
;  Rocío B. Hubert, Ana G. Maguitman, Carlos I. Chesñevar, Marcos A. Malamud
ID
#337
Abstract

Citymis Community is an EGOV app through which municipalities listen and respond to requests and complaints from the citizens. As a result of the successful adoption of Citymis Community in several municipalities, large amounts of data are daily generated, which require analysis by the corresponding service departments. The intelligent analysis of citizen requests and complaints can lead to improved levels of service coordination and can help in the decision-making process by relevant authorities. Advances in dynamic visualization technologies and data mining offer the opportunity to develop novel ways of analyzing these data. In this paper we present CitymisVis, a tool that extends Citymis Community by applying specifically developed methods for clustering and visually exploring geolocated reports. CitymisVis allows to perform a visual analysis of the geographic areas more affected by different kinds of issues and generates navigable representations offering statistics based on the collected data. In this way, CitymisVis helps to understand what issues require urgent intervention and allows to adequately reflect the proportions of different problems.

Keywords
Government 2.0; e-Governance; Citizen Requests and Complaints; Visualization; Data Mining
Authors
Rocío B. Hubert, Ana G. Maguitman, Carlos I. Chesñevar, Marcos A. Malamud
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#341
;  Ralf-Martin Soe
ID
#341
Abstract

This paper looks into how cities can offer joint digital services in the cross-border areas. By fact, most digital services are local and by large, most of them are developed in isolation from the neighbouring local governments, either national or international. In the digital area, this is a huge challenge, as independently developed digital services tend to be locked-in to specific standards making future cross-border services challenging. We propose a model for joint digital services in the cross-border cities – the Urban Operating System. The model will be validated in two Northern European cities with high commuting frequency: Helsinki and Tallinn.

Keywords
smart city; digital single market; interoperability; cross-border services; public service provision
Authors
Ralf-Martin Soe
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#344
;  Durgaprasad Misra, Alka Mishra, Sunil Babbar, Sunita Singh
ID
#344
Abstract

It is one of the prime intent of Government of India (GoI) to ensuremajority of government services to be delivered electronically to the citizen through the medium of web and mobile. It is therefore, besides making government services online, Digital India Programme of GoI is making concerted efforts towards improving the IT infrastructure and increasing Internet speed and penetration.

Most of the websites for Information/Service delivery does not follow the best web practices. It has been observed that majority of Government websites are facing critical problems like missing identity of the website, outdated and irrelevant content and inconsistent presentation and navigation strategy. Above all, websites are also lacking sensitivity towards differently abled section of society who requires careful attention to access the government information and services. These flaws in government web sites are creating hurdle for the citizens to effectively use them.

To address and resolve the above mentioned issue, the need of the hour is to build an efficient solution and mechanism. This will ensure effective delivery of information through the websites. In pursuance of the same, a set of guidelines were developed for Indian Government websites with an objective to make the Indian Government websites comply with the essential pre-requisites of UUU Trilogy i.e.; Usable, User-Centric and Universally Accessible and to establish a protocol for any website running under a Government establishment.

This paper discuss about the basic issues and challenges in implementing the "Guidelines for Indian Government Websites (GIGW)” on few Indian Government websites of its key establishments namely NIC (National Informatics Centre) Portal (http://www.nic.in), MeitY (Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology) Portal (http:// http://meity.gov.in) and Open Government Data Platform (https://data.gov.in) as well as a study conducted on National Mobile Governance Initiative (https://mgov.gov.in). This Paper also highlights the common reasons for the non-compliance of the guidelines and suggests mechanisms to expedite the process.

Keywords
Guideline; Web Usability; Web Accessibility; Standard; Indian Government Website; National Informatics Centre; GoI; Government of India; GIGW; WCAG; W3C; Website Quality Manual (WQM); Certified Quality Website (CQW)
Authors
Durgaprasad Misra, Alka Mishra, Sunil Babbar, Sunita Singh
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#345
;  Lukasz Porwol, Adegboyega Ojo
ID
#345
Abstract

The high rate of adoption of Social Media technologies and platforms make them naturally appealing for engaging citizens. Interestingly, despite the proliferation of e-Participation platforms, overall efforts towards mainstreaming Social Media-based and citizen-led political deliberations are still limited. Consequently, there is a paucity of research on effectiveness of Social Media technologies as e-Participation platforms; barriers to their use for e-Participation and their potentials to reshape deliberations on traditional e-Participation platforms. This paper investigates the perceived barriers to e-Participation and affordances of Social Media from the perspectives of senior decision maker and political actors. Grounded in the analytical framework for the duality e-Participation, we designed an instrument and interviewed 10 politicians and decision makers at different levels of government across three countries in Europe. Our results provide insights into barriers and perceived affordances of Social Media for e-Participation as well as the necessary conditions for increased adoption of Social Media for citizen-led participation.

Keywords
e-Participation; Duality of e-Participation; Social Media Participatory Democracy; Online Political Deliberation; Social Media Mining
Authors
Lukasz Porwol, Adegboyega Ojo
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#358
;  Fatemeh Ahmadi Zeleti, Adegboyega Ojo
ID
#358
Abstract

Despite the existence of number of well-known conceptualization in e-Business and e-Commerce, there have been no efforts so far to develop a detailed, comprehensive conceptualization for business model. Current business literature is replete with fragmented conceptualizations, which only partially describe aspects of a business model. In addition, the existing conceptualizations do not explicitly support the emerging phenomenon of open government data – an increasingly valuable economic and strategic resource. Consequently, no comprehensive, formal, executable open government data business model ontology exists, that could be directly leveraged to facilitate the design, development of an operational open data business model. This paper bridges this gap by providing a parsimonious yet sufficiently detailed, conceptualization and formal ontology of open government data business model for open data-driven organizations. Following the design science approach, we developed the ontology as a ‘design artefact’ and validate the ontology by using it to describe an open data business model of an open data-driven organization.

Keywords
open government data; open data business model; open data-driven organization; formal conceptualization; e-Business ontology; e-Commerce ontology; and business model ontology
Authors
Fatemeh Ahmadi Zeleti, Adegboyega Ojo
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#360
;  Priyanshi Agrawal, Sahana H S, Rahul De'
ID
#360
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore the phenomenon of digital distraction. It starts with defining the concept, followed by a discussion of the factors that cause distraction and how users are suffering from it. Data is drawn from a sample population of students and certain inferences are drawn. A proposal has been made on how digital distraction can be measured. The paper concludes with some suggestions on how to overcome digital distraction and overload.

Keywords
Digital Distraction; Digital Overload; Cognitive Surplus; Smartphone; Whatsapp; Multitasking; Fear of Missing Out
Authors
Priyanshi Agrawal, Sahana H S, Rahul De'
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#362
;  Matthias Stuermer, Oliver Krancher, Thomas Myrach
ID
#362
Abstract

Public sector procurement of IT often happens without public tendering because of vendor lock-in, as our ongoing research suggests. We have analyzed 2754 IT procurement projects during the last 7 years on the official Swiss electronic tendering platform. The results indicate that 47.2% of these projects involved contracts above WTO threshold awarded to external IT suppliers without bidding procedure. This is mainly caused by the lack of alternative IT suppliers being able to support existing IT systems. In this paper we introduce a new method for measuring IT vendor lock-in and we present descriptive results including a time series analysis. We find a higher share of direct awards in IT projects than in non-IT projects.

Keywords
Public procurement; IT procurement; open tendering; limited tendering; direct awards; no-bid contracts; vendor lock-in; Swiss public sector procurement; open source software
Authors
Matthias Stuermer, Oliver Krancher, Thomas Myrach
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#367
;  Reshma Agarwal, Vinay Thakur, Radha Chauhan
ID
#367
Abstract

The paper describes an Enterprise Architecture for E-Government, for Governments across the world who intend to provide better service delivery for their business, citizens and other stakeholders. The purpose of Enterprise Architectures for E-Government is to support transactional system interoperability, quicker response to Government enterprise wide issues, reduce complexity in IT landscape, enhance enterprise security, facilitate information based decision making while driving efficiency, cost benefits, sharing, reuse, effectiveness and system transformation across government.

Keywords
Enterprise Architecture; E-Government; E-Governance; interoperability; industry architecture; TOGAF; principle
Authors
Reshma Agarwal, Vinay Thakur, Radha Chauhan
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#386
;  Morten Meyerhoff Nielsen, Nuno Ramos Carvalho, Linda Gonçalves Veiga, Luís Soares Barbosa
ID
#386
Abstract

Burden reduction is a key issue in modern public administrations’ and businesses’ agendas. Compliance with mandatory regulations can have a direct impact on a country’s economic performance, growth, and development. Research in this area, contributes to a better understanding of the implications and context of administrative burden, and increases the efficiency of the strategies adopted to reduce it.

The goal of this study is to undertake a review of the current state of the art on Administrative Burden Reduction (ABR), in order to gain a deeper insight about the subject, identify current gaps, and better plan for future research. A total of 122 papers were identified as relevant, out of a pool of 742 papers retrieved from the current literature. The relevant papers were analyzed across four dimensions: methodology, type and focus, and targeted stakeholders. Three key gaps were identified and discussed in relation to: citizen orientated services and burden reduction; empirical research and post-initiative re-evaluation; and, the role of stakeholders, interest groups and end-users in driving ABR. Lastly a conceptual framework model and next steps are proposed.

Keywords
Administrative burden reduction; red-tape; public administration; trends; literature review; research gaps; state of the art
Authors
Morten Meyerhoff Nielsen, Nuno Ramos Carvalho, Linda Gonçalves Veiga, Luís Soares Barbosa
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#392
;  Neena Pandey, Rahul De'
ID
#392
Abstract

Internet’s ever increasing positive and negative consequences (both intended and unintended) are leading to increased demand towards its improved design and better governance mechanisms. However, countries across the world are divided over the choice of Internet governance structure, i.e. multi-stakeholder versus multilateral form. This paper explores the role of institutional quality of countries on this choice. We base our empirical analysis on the WCIT-2012 data (of 144 countries) using the theory of legitimacy of governance forms. The analysis supports our hypothesized relationship. Further, a qualitative study of the ICT policies of 25 countries reveals the role of Internet affordances in this relationship. It also reveals how major national and international events can change the perceived affordances of Internet for countries which may have an effect on their preference for a particular governance structure.

Keywords
Internet governance; multi-stakeholder; multilateral; legitimacy; institutional quality; affordances
Authors
Neena Pandey, Rahul De'
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#407
;  Rehema Baguma
ID
#407
Abstract

In Uganda, 2.5 million children live with some form of disability but only about 9% of these that are of school going age attend primary school, compared with a National average of 92%, and only 6% of them continue studying in secondary schools. School going children with disabilities dropout of school due to among others the poor quality education they get compared to that given to the non-disabled children. ICTs can be a valuable tool for these learners who are vulnerable to exclusion from educational opportunities. Use of ICT in teaching and learning usually improves the efficiency and effectiveness of a mainstream individual learner. But , for a disabled learner, use of ICTs particularly that adapted to their abilities acts as a sort of extension of their physical body part and provides an opportunity to communicate, participate more meaningfully in learning activities and become gainfully employed. For PwDs to use ICTs and ICT enabled services, they need appropriate Assistive Technologies. Therefore, mainstream ICTs and ICT enabled services must be adapted to work with assistive technologies. The adapted ICTs are commonly called inclusive ICTs. In Uganda, the status of provision and support for use of inclusive ICTs in general and in the education of PwDs in particular, is not known.  A few studies have reported low level accessibility of ICT and ICT enabled services for PwDs but at a general level.  Therefore, more effort is needed not only to report the status but also to address the gaps. Relevant policies such as the 2011 Draft Special Needs and Inclusive Education policy, the Uganda National ICT policy, the Rural Communication Development Fund (RCDF) and the Government of Uganda Website Standards are all silent about making ICTs accessible in general and in the education for PwDs in particular.

This paper reports results  of an audit of inclusive ICTs for education of PwDs in Uganda.  The study was an implementation of the first phase of the UNESCO policy on inclusive ICTs in education for PwDs in Uganda. The aim of the study was to audit current actions in Uganda on use of inclusive ICTs in education for PwDs and provide recommendations on actions needed to increase use of inclusive ICTs for education of PwDs.  Due to time, and resource constraints, and the interest of the sponsor, the scope of disabilities covered in the study was limited to visual and hearing impairments

Keywords
Inclusive ICTs; People with Disabilities; Inclusive education; Uganda
Authors
Rehema Baguma
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#417
;  M. Mahmudul Hasan, Dimosthenis Aganostopoulos, Pericles Loucopoulos, Mara Nikolaidou
ID
#417
Abstract

Electronic government (e-Government) is increasingly gaining attention by the government and researcher to shape the public sector into digital society through enacting several e-Government system development policies and regulations. Hence, the compliance of regulatory requirement from these policies and regulations become an important accountability in e-Government project development where the concepts of regulatory requirements compliance is still scattered in the e-Government domain. This paper presents an ontology framework that describes the formal and explicit specification of the concepts of regulatory requirements compliance and their relations in e-Government system development. The ontology engineering technique 101 and Systematic Literature Review (SLR) were used in the process of developing the ontology framework of e-Government regulatory requirements compliance (eGovRRC). The e-Government system analyst can use this framework as a reference model to understand and conceptualize the interlinked set of clearly defined concepts of regulatory requirements compliance in e-Government system development projects.

Keywords
Regulatory requirements Compliance; e-Government; Ontology Framework; e-Government regulation and policy
Authors
M. Mahmudul Hasan, Dimosthenis Aganostopoulos, Pericles Loucopoulos, Mara Nikolaidou
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#420
;  Emmanuel Eilu, Rehema Baguma
ID
#420
Abstract

Mobile phones have a high potential to enhance citizen participation in political decision-making in developing countries. However, despite this great potential, mobile phones have not yet gained much acceptance as e-voting tools in developing countries due to poor user experience (UX). User experience is the pleasure and satisfaction a person gets before (also called anticipated user experience- AUX), during and after using a product or a service. User experience has been under extensive study over the last decade, generating a number of user experience design and evaluation models and frameworks. Nevertheless, existing UX models and frameworks provide very little on how before use (AUX) can be attained. Many of the existing models and frameworks focus on how user experience during and after use of a product can be achieved. One of the few frameworks that cover AUX was developed by Yogasara, called the ''characteristics of anticipated user experience''. Although the framework gives basic hints on what designers should be looking out for in the early stages of systems development, the framework is generic and of a high-level nature, without an illustration or explanation about how it can be used in the development of an ICT-enabled product/service with positive AUX. In this paper, we extend Yogasara’s framework and show how the characteristics that engender positive user experience in Yogasara’s framework can be realized in mobile voting systems to influences acceptance and usage of mobile phones for voting in a developing country like Uganda.

Keywords
User Experience; Mobile Phone Voting; Developing Countries
Authors
Emmanuel Eilu, Rehema Baguma
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#428
;  Neena Pandey
ID
#428
Abstract

The complexities involved in ‘Internet governance’ has led to it being called as an ‘oxymoron’ considering the very simplistic  design principles that the network infrastructure is based upon and the complexities involved in governing it. Nations across the world are grappling with the negative impact that Internet creates along with its intended positive impact. Hence, in this paper, we build an Internet Governance maturity model which can act as a benchmark towards assessing a nation’s maturity in handling these issues. While primarily being descriptive, the maturity model be considered prescriptive when nations can take specific steps towards attaining a higher maturity of Internet governance. Further, the paper studies India’s maturity position in detail to validate the prescribed model.

Keywords
Internet governance; maturity model; India
Authors
Neena Pandey
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#430
;  Md Gofran Faroqi, Noore Alam Siddiquee
ID
#430
Abstract

This paper examines a Bangladeshi telecentre initiative, the Union Digital Centre (UDC), in terms of its benefits to users. It uses ‘the diffusion of innovation theory’ as an analytical framework and draws on data collected from a survey of 154 users and 41 interviews with management stakeholders. The study shows that the UDC has generally succeeded in providing users with easy and convenient access to information and services. The UDC has relative advantages over alternative service delivery arrangements, and that it has produced positive impacts on bridging the digital divide in the Bangladesh society. Notwithstanding, the overall impact has remained modest as the range of services currently available is quite limited; given its present handicaps the UDC is yet to have significant impacts on broader developmental goals and objectives.

Keywords
Telecentre; union digital centre; digital divide; innovation; Bangladesh
Authors
Md Gofran Faroqi, Noore Alam Siddiquee
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#433
;  Sanjeev Kumar Katara, Avinash Pokhriyal
ID
#433
Abstract

The secure border management is a complex process when it comes to cross border transportation. The lack of visibility of operations at ground level results in long delays at check points and encourages many corrupt practices. This may lead to infiltration and other fraudulent activities. This paper focuses on developing a comprehensive framework for secure cross-border operations in Indian perspective. An improved Border Security System is proposed that uses ICT between the systems operated by Government and Public sector agencies for exchange of error-free and secure information between sender and government authorities. This leads to faster cross-border movements, increased accuracy in detecting non-compliant shipments, reduce fraudulent practices and ensure that the shipment is not compromised while in transit. A smart security framework utilizing GPS and object-specific RFID technology is proposed to minimize border risks and to provide authentic information. A few challenges and suggestions for the same have also been discussed.

Keywords
Border Security System; e-Seal; GPS; Framework; ICT; India; RFID Reader; RFID Tag; Signature Value; Shipment
Authors
Sanjeev Kumar Katara, Avinash Pokhriyal
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#439
;  Aditi Pathak, Avni Gupta
ID
#439
Abstract

The purpose of this study is to understand the relation and causation between digital preparedness, better governance and development. This paper attempts to study this both at a macro level by using inter country data and at the micro level by analysing two schemes by the Government of India.

The picture that emerged at the macro level might be very different from what is happening at the micro level where the schemes are actually implemented and citizens / businesses seek services and transact with the government through e-channels.

The findings of this study would enable us understand and navigate the complexity associated with deployment of ICT in government and should aim to create a ‘New Normal’ in government functioning, wherein, public services are provided by government agencies in an efficient and effective manner. The results of this study matter more as the government is in the process of implementing initiatives like Digital India, Skill India and Smart Cities.

To calculate governance index parameter, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on world development indicators of governance of Control of Corruption: Estimate, Government Effectiveness: Estimate, Political Stability and Absence of Violence/Terrorism: Estimate, Regulatory Quality: Estimate, Rule of Law: Estimate, Voice and Accountability: Estimate.

To gauge the digital preparedness of a country, instead of using the standard e-Governance index released by United Nations (UN), we have performed principal component analysis on the sub-indices released by UN that is e-Participation index, Online services index, Telecommunications index to prepare the modified e-Governance index. However, HDI and GNI   (per capita) were used as standard indicators of socio-economic and economic development.

 The second part to the study will try to compare two digitisation schemes implemented in India and analyse the relative success achieved by both. This study is largely based on the exploratory survey, secondary research and collective experience of the organizations involved in the study. As part of the exploratory survey, views, inputs and feedback from several stakeholders in the e-Government community in India will be gathered and compiled.

Drawing from these inputs received and a large body of secondary source of knowledge, the paper will broadly summarizes  the current issues and challenges in the context of Project Management in two Flagship digitisation schemes in India and the suggested strategic shift required in the approach to make the schemes more viable.

Keywords
Governance Index; Digital Preparedness; Project Management in e-Governance
Authors
Aditi Pathak, Avni Gupta
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#442
;  Aparna Krishn, Gopal Naik
ID
#442
Abstract

The paper addresses two issues related to agricultural information delivery. First is the problem of poor access to agricultural information delivery platforms to farmers, including platforms that use information technology. The paper explores a hypothesis that the poor access  is partly due to the  poor quality information delivery platforms as they do not provide all the attributes that information of good quality should have.

Second is the problem of attributing change in performance of agriculture to improvement in information delivery. The paper presents results from evaluation of a two year project conducted in Southern India that used traditional way of providing information, namely a personalised contact with farmers but supplemented that with latest information technology methods and provided information to farmers on several crops on multiple aspects of crop production. The project was conducted in Karnataka from 2013-2015 and had three hundred farmers each in both treatment and control groups. The experimental design of the project helps in making causal inferences about the treatment effect.

Information needs of farmers have been divided into six groups.  They range from information on how to acquire the right land for cultivation to information on various options for value addition (Meitie & Devi, 2009).  In this paper the focus is mostly on agricultural inputs, i.e. use of right seeds, fertilizers and plant protection chemicals, information on weather conditions, proper use of mechanization etc.; which can simply be put as ‘know-how’ category of information (Mittal, Gandhi, & Tripathi, 2010) but within the local context of the area studied.

Also while the inferences drawn in the study may be applicable to several agricultural products and their producers, the write-up has been written with primarily field crops in mind and the term farmers has been used to indicate farmers growing field crops.

Authors
Aparna Krishn, Gopal Naik
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#443
;  Rakesh Gupta, Inder Pal Singh Sethi, Vivek Gupta, Ashutosh Prasad Maurya, Ramya Rajamanickam
ID
#443
Abstract

Country India is the fastest growing mobile subscribers market in the world with more than 850 million subscribers. Continuous developments in mobile technology have led to massive acquisition and adoption of mobile devices at a fast pace. The penetration of mobile use is higher in developing countries than that in developed countries. The emerging developments as well as rapid adaptability of mobile technologies have raised research interests in the field of mobile government. In this paper, we analyze the potential of e-Governance and web services in m-Governance citing the exemplary work of project Telecom Commercial Communication Customer Preference (TCCCP). M-Governance is envisaged to propel the functioning of the government, at the next higher level.

Mobile phones have become an important component in Indian household. But the telemarketing calls are a major cause of worry not only for people in India, but across the globe. Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) is proactively and constantly working towards curbing of Unsolicited Commercial Communications (UCC) which also grew along with the telecom Industry. The Authority also faces various set of concerns like making consumers choose their preference of UCC messages they wish to receive, either to block them or partially allow them, escalation of complaints, resolution of complaint with in stipulated time frame, communication to customer regarding their complain status and to monitor all the Service Providers. This paper gives an overview of NCPR (National Customer Preference Register) implementation, which aims to develop a collaborative and unified service platform to ensure seamless integration of various stakeholders, the consumers, the Tele Marketer (TM), The Service Provider (SP) as a major step towards a transparent, accountable and 24x7 service platform. This paper also emphasizes the role of Do Not Disturb (DND) Services app and how web services were used for the same. This is a unique initiative step in the country. Only few countries in the world have implemented such solutions to curb UCC and handle them with respect to consumer preference.

Keywords
Do Not Disturb; Telecom; UCC - Unsolicited Commercial Communications; TM – Telemarketer; SP – Service Providers; Customer Support; NCCPR-National Consumer Call Preference Registry; web Services; m-Governance
Authors
Rakesh Gupta, Inder Pal Singh Sethi, Vivek Gupta, Ashutosh Prasad Maurya, Ramya Rajamanickam
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#449
;  Amal Marzouki, Sehl Mellouli, Sylvie Daniel
ID
#449
Abstract

Governments are more and more adopting Citizens’ participation processes since they may help better understand needs and better reach communities’ goals. With the emergence of ICTs, citizens’ participation processes took new forms such as social media, blogs and participative platforms. Nevertheless, although citizens’ participation outstands a great value for governments, its implementation raises several issues. Based on a review of the literature, this paper identifies a typology of issues regarding the implementation of CP processes. This paper is an attempt to open new research avenues on citizens’ participation through the multidisciplinary typology of issues it proposes. As well, drawing on two categories of issues (citizens’ and technology issues), a context-based citizen participation approach is proposed that is based on three main concepts: context-based reasoning, spatio-temporal representation, and visual analytics. Further empirical studies need to be established to assert the relevance of the proposed approach.

Keywords
public participation; e-Participation; context-based reasoning; geographic information systems GIS; visualization
Authors
Amal Marzouki, Sehl Mellouli, Sylvie Daniel
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#452
;  Rajan Gupta, Sunil K Muttoo, Saibal K Pal
ID
#452
Abstract

In this paper, we describe the key research questions handled during the doctoral work done in the area of E-Governance. The five research questions in the study are related to the concepts like Development of E-Governance & its assessment, Infrastructure management to reach out to maximum citizens, Various types of Security concerns faced during the E-Governance Development, Analyzing the E-Governance transaction pattern to capture citizen’s interest, and finally the way ahead for the E-Governance development through the route of efficiency and optimization in the service designing. The methodology adopted and results obtained for various research questions are discussed at high level. Some portion of the current work is still in progress.

Keywords
E-Governance; Development Assessment Index; Location Allocation; Common Service Centers; Intrusion Detection System; Security; Analytics
Authors
Rajan Gupta, Sunil K Muttoo, Saibal K Pal
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#460
;  Rajiv Kumar, Amit Sachan, Arindam Mukherjee
ID
#460
Abstract

Potential benefits and popularity of e-government (e-Gov) have attracted researchers and practitioners across countries. E-Gov adoption is an important area to research. Extant e-Gov adoption models are narrow in their scope and focus on partial issues. Methodologically they do not provide strong theoretical framework and have not comprehensively integrated all factors of e-Gov adoption. Therefore, the need arises to explore the factors that influence citizens to adopt e-Gov services.

In order to assess e-Gov services, numbers of e-Gov maturity stage models have been proposed by researchers, consulting firms, and international organizations. Characteristics of different type of e-Gov services differ and different service maturity levels offer different modes of service with different levels of association of technology. As a result, adoption criteria for e-Gov services of different maturity stages might have signi?cant implications on their adoption. The critical factors that influence citizens to adopt e-Gov services at different maturity levels may vary.

The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence citizens to adopt e-Gov services and the factors to adopt e-Gov at different stages of service maturity. In addition, the study will also identify the factors that will influence users to move from using e-Gov services of one maturity stage to another maturity stage.

Qualitative as well quantitative research methodologies are used for the purpose of this research. Qualitative research will be used to develop theories and suitable here because e-Gov research is in premature stage. Findings from qualitative research will be further validated by quantitative technique.

Keywords
E-government; Adoption; Maturity; Citizens; India; ICTs.
Authors
Rajiv Kumar, Amit Sachan, Arindam Mukherjee
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#463
;  George Varkey, Aravind Balakrishnan, Prajith R.
ID
#463
Abstract

Patients in critical care need close monitoring and quick response to deteriorating conditions. The window of opportunity for action is usually quite short before the situation becomes irreversibly complicated. Therefore, a system that enables the doctors to get an integrated view of the patient information on an anytime/anywhere basis, over mobile devices would be of immense value. This paper describes an acute care system that can be set up and made fully operational within a few hours, at a fraction of the cost of competing solutions. This system is designed considering the specific needs of developing countries which include – intermittent internet connection at operational locations, and limited information technology knowledge among supporting staff. This makes it ideal in providing support for medical requirements in remote areas, disaster sites, conflict zones, etc. It is also useful for home health care and in the intensive care units, operation theatres and emergency wards of hospitals.

Keywords
Tele-medicine; HIMS; M-Health; Cloud Computing; Mobile Applications
Authors
George Varkey, Aravind Balakrishnan, Prajith R.
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#464
;  Ana Rivoir, Javier Landinelli
ID
#464
Abstract

In this “ongoing research paper” we seek to briefly present how information and communication technologies (ICT) have enabled civic engagement in the Open Government Partnership National Action Plan’s creation and implementation in Uruguay.  We analyze the conceptual references implied on open government and civic engagement, which helped us to establish our key methodological criteria and our research question; we contextualize the Uruguayan case and explicit our primary findings about the National Action Plan (NAP) implementation to formulate preliminary considerations and finally enunciate our hypothesis.

Keywords
ICT-mediated citizen engagement; Open Government; multi-stakeholder policy process
Authors
Ana Rivoir, Javier Landinelli
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#468
;  Faiz Ahmed Chundeli
ID
#468
Abstract

Urbanization and especially suburbanization are increasing challenges to urban planner around the world. These processes occur at faster pace than regulatory bodies can manage and the use of geo-spatial techniques has become a must if we want to have any chance for a rational planning process. In this paper, a part of a broader question “can a 3D city model and its visualization support urban planners in obtaining a greater understanding of a given urban problem and enhance decision making?” is explored. A 3D information rich model (3DIRM) of case area (Kannadasan Nagar, Chennai) is generated using ArcGIS and ArcScene with the following information such as, land-use, road width, permissible floor space index (FSI), height of the building, setbacks, building use etc. Classification of 3DIRM based on local zoning regulation was carried out to check with the compliance of development codes. By strictly following code compliance, the buildings in case area can be classified into three types, ordinary buildings (OB-77%), special buildings (SB-20%) and multi-storied buildings (MSB-3%), whereas as the actual development observed is OB-75%, SB-4% and MSB-21%, more than 20,000 sq.m of built-up area is added under MSB typology which has gone unnoticed by the development authority. Results suggest that having an advanced geo-spatial tool such as 3D GIS can help urban planner in enhancing the decision making processes and the implementation of zoning regulations.

Keywords
3D GIS; 3D City Model; Urban Planning; Geo-Spatial Technology
Authors
Faiz Ahmed Chundeli
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#474
;  Mahesh Kumar Jat, Shuchi Mala
ID
#474
Abstract

In developing countries, Dengue Fever is an alarming concern for public health authorities. According to the recent reports of World Health Organization (WHO), in 2015, Delhi, India, recorded its worst outbreak since 2006 with over 15000 Dengue Fever (DF) cases. According to WHO (Global Environmental Change, Geneva) report there is a strong indication of inter-annual variability and connection between meteorological factors and infectious diseases such as DF and many other vector-borne diseases. Therefore, integration of surrounding important causative factors of vector-borne diseases such as DF along with Geographic Information System (GIS) and statistical methods will further improve the efficiency of identification and prediction of disease outbreaks. The present work is aimed to demonstrate use of Digital Geo-spatial technologies to identify potential hot spots of DF incidences so that proactive actions can be taken to control its spread. Space-time clustering for DF incidences using Kulldorff’s space-time scan statistic method has been performed to determine the clusters of DF outbreaks geographically. Also, high risk areas are identified spatially with the help of Getis-Ord Gi* statistic implemented in GIS. Furthermore, acquired data was then analyzed for correlation with meteorological parameters such as wind speed, humidity and demographic factors such as age and gender.  The statistically significant space and space-time clusters of DF have been identified, thus showing that their occurrence is not random. The results revealed that there is a significant relationship between meteorological parameters and DF incidences. Study is helpful for the health authorities of Delhi to take proactive actions in identified DF clusters to contain its spread and risk.

Keywords
Dengue Fever; Statistically Significant; Geographic Weighted Regression; Space-Time Clusters; Geographic Information System
Authors
Mahesh Kumar Jat, Shuchi Mala
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#485
;  Siddharth Srivastava, Sumit Soman, Astha Rai, Amarjeet Cheema, Praveen Kumar Srivastava
ID
#485
Abstract

Implementation of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has become essential towards delivery of standardized healthcare services, particularly in developing nations. Legacy hospital management systems developed earlier lack compliance to EHR guidelines and required standards. In this paper, we focus on a specific aspect of EHR, the Continuity of Care Document (CCD), which is a standard format used for ubiquitous migration of patient information and medical records across hospital management systems. We discuss the challenges involved in implementation of CCD for legacy systems and present case studies on such a system with a view to understand the gap and effort required in such an endeavour. We also introduce an SDK and web API for assisting organizations to easily extending the existing Hospital Information Systems to generate CCD. This would be useful for developers of healthcare solutions in understanding and practically implementing the same.

Keywords
Hospital Management Information Systems, Continuity of Care Document, Electronic Health Record, Health Standards
Authors
Siddharth Srivastava, Sumit Soman, Astha Rai, Amarjeet Cheema, Praveen Kumar Srivastava
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#487
;  Durgaprasad Misra, Alka Mishra, Sunil Babbar, Varun Gupta
ID
#487
Abstract

In a developing country like India, with complex issues at hand evidence-based Planning of socio-economic development processes must rely on quality data. As quality data is not easily accessible, there is a general need to facilitate sharing and utilization of the large amount of data generated by Ministries/Departments/Organizations/ States of India in an open format exposing them for further value addition to enable effective governance and enhanced public service delivery.

Over the last decade or so the idea of open data in correlation with the idea of open government data has gained a lot of prominence and limelight, courtesy the continuous effort of the citizen groups demanding a more transparent and accountable governance. Recognizing the importance of availability of open data to its citizen for increased levels of transparency and accountability and to promote higher level of public participation the Government of India under the aegis of National Data Sharing and Accessibility Policy (NDSAP) initiated Open Government Data (OGD) Platform India to share government data with its citizens. This has built a foundation to create an open data ecosystem in the country.

NDSAP was gazette notified on 17th March 2012 mandating the government entities to proactively release their datasets in Open Format. According to the preamble of NDSAP, there has been an increasing demand by the community that data collected with the deployment of public funds should be made more readily available to all, for enabling rational debate, better decision making and use in meeting civil society needs.

Implementation of NDSAP through OGD Platform since its Alpha release in 2012 has been increasing the usability and relevance of open government data and sustaining the ecosystem around it. In this paper we are trying to analyze the policy implementation strategy and how that has created a sustainable open government data ecosystem in various sectors.

Keywords
Open Government Data Ecosystems; Open Government Data; Open Data; Data Ecosystems; National Data Sharing and Accessibility Policy, NDSAP; Open Government Data Platform; OGD platform; Open Data Use License; National Informatics Centre; NIC; MeitY; Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology; India
Authors
Durgaprasad Misra, Alka Mishra, Sunil Babbar, Varun Gupta
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#489
;  Rupal Sethi
ID
#489
Abstract

Governments and policy makers, especially for developing countries are adopting digital means to solve societal problems such as health, education and safety through Transformational Information Technology systems. Such a transformation in the field of education has been brought by Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) which aim to empower learners through an online medium of training overcoming physical and financial limitations. However, this large scale intervention is marred by a serious dropout problem. This paper address the dropout problem in MOOCs through improvement in its interface design. I assert that it is imperative to identify the cause of the mismatch between the goals of designer (in terms of his expectations) and that of the participants (in terms of their intentions) for using the MOOC. In this paper, I present affordances as the ‘theory of solution’ to facilitate bidirectional communication between the instructor and participants through a better design, thus leading to lower dropout rates. I conduct a longitudinal case study to analyze the design and use phases of a MOOC in a premier management institute. Through this work, I plan to contribute towards extending the understanding of the affordance concept in the field of Information Systems by developing an Affordance Perception-Actualization-Assessment process model. This work has strong policy implications in identifying and correcting the causes of high dropout rates among learners using MOOCs.

Keywords
MOOCs; dropouts; affordance; unintended consequences; design; learning; policy
Authors
Rupal Sethi
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#493
;  Priya Seetharaman
ID
#493
Abstract

Information Technology (IT) governance has been a topic of interest and concern amongst information systems researchers and practitioners alike.  Although it has been widely studied in the context of business firms, there is a paucity of research on how technology governance is effected in the e-government context. The importance of this can hardly be exaggerated given the extensive funding in e-government projects and the growing dependence on technology to deliver citizen centric services.  This study aims to use secondary data on the Health Management Information Systems project in India, as a single case study to highlight the processes, structures and mechanisms used to effect IT governance in an e-government context while also using the same to highlight potential gaps between the intended governance policy and implementation.  Through this, the study aims to highlight the need for more conscious attempts at anticipating and resolving information technology governance challenges in the e-government context.

Keywords
IT Governance; E-Governance; HMIS; Health IT; Healthcare; Systems; Processes; Mechanisms
Authors
Priya Seetharaman
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#497
;  Gabriela Viale Pereira, Bettina Rinnerbauer, Michael Ginner, Peter Parycek
ID
#497
Abstract

E-Government implementation and adoption is influenced by several factors having either an enhancing or an aggravating effect on e-government implementation and use. This paper aims at shedding light on obstacles hindering mainly e-government implementation from two perspectives: the supply- and the demand-side of e-government services. The contribution to research is seen in summarized insights into what obstacles in e-government were identified in prior research and the suggestion of a classification of obstacles into the two categories of formal and informal obstacles. Literature was reviewed following a conceptual model encompassing a merger and extension of existing approaches. A process of identifying obstacles and improving services in the form of a loop is discussed before possible future research lines will be pointed to.

Keywords
e-government; Obstacle; Hurdle; Barrier; e-public service; implementation; Technology acceptance; Usability; Ease of use; Formal; Informal; Bundled up needs; Service-bundles
Authors
Gabriela Viale Pereira, Bettina Rinnerbauer, Michael Ginner, Peter Parycek
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#508
;  Priyanka Ivatury, Angel Jeena, Amit Prakash
ID
#508
Abstract

In this paper, we present a case for using participatory approaches in the design and development of information and communications technology or ICT-based systems to incorporate the complexities embedded in the Indian public health sector and bring desired changes, especially in programme implementation processes. A team of researchers worked closely with prospective users and various other relevant stakeholders as a part of an ongoing action research project involving health facilities in Kolar district of the southern Indian state of Karnataka over a ten month period. These interactions with health workers and medical professionals responsible for administering the National Programme for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases & Stroke (NPCDCS) provided useful insights in designing and developing an automated reporting system for use initially in a community health centre (CHC). An ongoing and continuous involvement is helping in enlisting a high degree of participation thereby allowing co-creation of more improved variants of the ICT-based reporting system.

Keywords
Public Health; ICTD; Participation; Co-creation
Authors
Priyanka Ivatury, Angel Jeena, Amit Prakash
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#515
;  Vikram Singh Parmar
ID
#515
Abstract

In this paper, we present a design approach that could be followed to develop ICT based products and services in the resource constraint environment. Our literature review on past ICT projects underscores the challenge of low adoption especially in emerging market such as India. This situation could be attributed to mismatch between information offered versus actually required by the users, information representation, projects with tech-driven approach rather user driven, and overlooking users literacy level.

In the context of ICT4D, users are supposed to be the central beneficiary, and they could be involved early-on in the development and testing phases. The proposed design approach advocates integration of Rogers’s diffusion theory and user centered design cycle to develop product brief and technological development of the ICT projects. We link Rogers’s innovation attributes to the design process of ICT products and services.

Keywords
Innovation attribute; design evaluation; user centered design; information representation; ICT4D
Authors
Vikram Singh Parmar
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#529
;  Muhammad Irfanullah Arfeen, Javed Iqbal, Muhammad Jamil Mushtaq
ID
#529
Abstract

This study examined that many e-Government application suits are developed, but their implementation is jeopardized due to certain administrative issues in Pakistan. E-Government brings a radical change in business process, organizational culture, and human behavior and change is resisted by human nature unless proper awareness about it is created among the stakeholders and enforced through administrative measures. Therefore, we are focused on the successful implementation of G2G e-Government programs in Pakistan. This paper presents a four layered holistic framework for the successful implementation of e-Government programs in G2G sector of e-Government in Pakistan. The target audience of the survey is limited to local IT industry professionals, government employees, bureaucrats, and members of the parliament. Sample size for survey is limited to 250. We need to put the things in their right perspective. Top level political leadership must own the e-Government initiatives to make them successful. The proposed framework encompasses all the prerequisites which play a pivotal role in the success of e-Government. As it is based on the collective wisdom of the key stakeholders in G2G sector of e-Government, it can be very useful for the successful implementation of e-Government programs if implemented in its true spirit.

Keywords
ICT; e-Government; G2G; G2C; G2B; e-Governance
Authors
Muhammad Irfanullah Arfeen, Javed Iqbal, Muhammad Jamil Mushtaq
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#531
;  Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Nripendra P. Rana, Mina Tajvidi, Banita Lal, G. P. Sahu, Ashish Gupta
ID
#531
Abstract

Driven by rising citizen expectations and the need for government innovation, social media has become a key component of e-government in a very short period of time. A number of research papers have been published on the role of social media in e-government in last few years. This study performs a literature review of the articles on the use of social media for getting access to e-government websites from the perspective of citizens. The database search through Scopus resulted in 115 articles, which formed the basis of this literature review. The keywords analysis of these articles indicates that ‘e-government’ and ‘social media’ were the most explored keywords across these studies. The methodological analysis indicates that the majority of the studies were analytical/conceptual/descriptive/theoretical in nature. The theoretical analysis, however, indicates that there is a lack of such research that has used some well-established theories or models to understand this concept. The review of literature further indicates that research themes such as ‘electronic participation’, ‘engagement’, ‘transparency’, ‘communication/ interaction’, ‘trust’ and ‘collaboration’ were found as some of the most frequently used categories under this area of research.

Keywords
Citizens; Digital Government; e-Government; Engagement; Literature Analysis; Participation; Social Media
Authors
Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Nripendra P. Rana, Mina Tajvidi, Banita Lal, G. P. Sahu, Ashish Gupta
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#538
;  Abhishek Behl, Pratima Sheorey, Sushma Nayak, Ajith Kumar VV
ID
#538
Abstract

Governance is being intensely impacted by Information and Communications Technology (ICT) to bolster government operations, draw in body politic, provide essential public goods and render key government services. Commensurate with the objectives of participatory democracy, an extensive variety of electronic correspondence vehicles, for example, the Internet and email are being deployed to improve citizen engagement. The present study intends to explore the factors involved in e-participation as well as the expanse of e-governance in India. By drawing out variables from extant literature, the study proceeds toward identifying people’s participation in e-governance, the circumstances that bolster such participation, factors responsible for reduced involvement, and steps that may be initiated for enhanced involvement and engagement in future. It is understood that people’s participation in electronic democracy is contingent upon several factors such as privacy, technical support, accessibility, integrity, open access to every stakeholder, clarity in agenda of discussion, perceived risk of identity, as well as awareness and popularity of electronic media. In a nutshell, the study contributes towards building a bond between the trio - technology, governance and individuals.

Keywords
Information and Communication Technology; e-Participation; enablers; India; multiple regression
Authors
Abhishek Behl, Pratima Sheorey, Sushma Nayak, Ajith Kumar VV
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#543
;  Niels Netten, Mortaza S. Bargh, Sunil Choenni, Ronald Meijer
ID
#543
Abstract

The collection and analysis of relevant data for evaluating public policies is not a straightforward task. An important type of such studies is the so-called ex-post evaluation. The main objective of ex-post evaluations is to determine to what extent a realized intervention is successful in tackling a societal challenge, e.g., youth unemployment. At a first glance an obvious method is to collect some baseline measurements for a set of relevant variables, apply the intervention for a while and collect the new measurement values for the same set of variables. Then, comparing the measurement values of the variables before and after the intervention provides an insight into the extent of successfulness of the intervention. This, however, is only true if the "ceteris paribus" condition holds. In practice it is infeasible to enforce this condition for societal challenges. Often, after having the baseline measurements, several phenomena emerge that may impact the new measurements without being taken into account. This makes it difficult to determine how much of the measured differences between the values of the variables before and after the intervention should be attributed to the emerging phenomena (or the so-called counterfactuals) and how much of the differences can be attributed to the applied intervention.

This paper discusses how exploiting big data may contribute to the task of elucidating the influences of counterfactuals (and interventions) in ex-post evaluation studies. The paper proposes a framework to utilize big data for accounting for the impact of emerging phenomena in ex-post evaluation studies.

Keywords
Big data, counterfactuals, data linkage, ex-post policy evaluation
Authors
Niels Netten, Mortaza S. Bargh, Sunil Choenni, Ronald Meijer
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#544
;  Evgeny Patarakin, Vasiliy Burov, Igor Remorenko
ID
#544
Abstract

This paper presents the transition from single socio-educational projects to educational community of practice. Visual storytelling augmented with sociograms helps community contributors to understand the social structure of interaction which in many respects is determining the success of collaboration. Using a combination of logfile analysis and social network analysis, we have gained insights into the effective design of a collaborative documents improvement system, which fosters the creation and growth of community of practice.

Keywords
e-governance; collaboration; crowdsourcing; community of practice; learning analytics; visual storytelling
Authors
Evgeny Patarakin, Vasiliy Burov, Igor Remorenko
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#545
;  Ian Tucker, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Djoko Sigit Sayogo
ID
#545
Abstract

Overcoming data and information challenges in emergency response increasingly requires the use of collaborative data analytics (CDA). CDA represents the collaborative processes of various actors with different expertise and affiliations to jointly analyze data using advanced information technologies and sophisticated techniques. The purpose of this paper is to propose a preliminary framework to examine the factors and challenges pertinent to CDA in emergency situations. The framework proposed in this paper classifies the challenges and determinants of CDA into four broad categories: (1) skills-related, (2) organizational, (3) political, and (4) technological. The four components influence how CDA works and influence how each expert interacts with one another to analyze data, make collective decisions, and synthesize crisis learning. In turn, the lessons identified from crisis learning will be used to refine the data analysis process in the CDA effort. In addition, the processes and outcomes of CDA, as well as the resulting crisis learning, are affected by the type of crisis at hand.

Keywords
Analytics, Emergency Response, Collaboratio
Authors
Ian Tucker, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Djoko Sigit Sayogo
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#548
;  Jorge Ardenghi, Pablo Fillottrani, Karina Cenci
ID
#548
Abstract

Data interoperability allows information sharing between different organizations, both public and private, for mutual benefits. This paper presents a case study providing an initial level of government data interoperability. SIGEVA is a set of applications for the management and evaluation of researchers and projects in the National Research Council (CONICET) in Argentina. The relevance of the case relies on promoting overcoming barriers in data exchange, although it exhibits several drawbacks. The case study is analyzed focusing in data interoperability; particularly in how to model a middleware to improve data interoperability between organizations with heterogeneous software applications. We show that data interoperability between organizations is a tendency to improve the activities of end-user, breaking down information silos. Furthermore, the solution requires to consider the levels of interoperability and barriers during the development process. Finally, in view of the detected problem, we propose a data interoperability solution with the properties of ensuring semantic consistency and overcoming heterogeneity.

Keywords
Interoperability; Data Interoperability; Government Information Sharing; Electronic Government
Authors
Jorge Ardenghi, Pablo Fillottrani, Karina Cenci
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#550
;  Elisa Quartucci, José Fernández-Ardáiz, Elsa Estevez, Carlos Iván Chesñevar
ID
#550
Abstract

Bahía Blanca is an Argentinean medium-sized city located in the south of Buenos Aires Province, pioneering the implementation and institutionalizing the practice of Open Government (OG). Through dedicated efforts, the local Government has been encouraging the opening and ample dissemination of government data.  Transparency and participation are the main principles characterizing the Government’s roadmap for different OG policies and initiatives. This paper summarizes main aspects of the implemented initiatives, their evolution – from open government to open city, as well as lessons learnt, achieved and expected impact.

Keywords
Open Government; Open Data; Transparency; Public Policy; Open City
Authors
Elisa Quartucci, José Fernández-Ardáiz, Elsa Estevez, Carlos Iván Chesñevar
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#561
;  Ricardo Matheus, Marijn Janssen
ID
#561
Abstract

Most cities have limited resources to become a smart city. Yet some cities have been more successful than others in becoming a smart city. This raises the questions why were some cities able to become smart, whereas other were not able to do so? This research is aimed at identifying factors influencing the shift towards becoming a smart city. In this way insight is gained into factors that governments can influence to become a smart city. First, Literature was reviewed to identify dimensions and factors enabling or impeding the process of becoming a smart city. These factors were used to compare two similar type of case studies. The cases took different paths to become a smart city and had different levels of success. This enabled us to identify factors influencing the move towards smart cities. The results reveal that existing infrastructures should be used and extended in such a way that they can facilitate a variety of different applications. Synergy from legacy systems can avoid extra expenditures. Having such an infrastructure in place facilitates the development of new organizational models. These models are developed outside the existing organization structure to avoid hinder from existing practices and organizational structures. This finding suggests that smart cities focussed on structural ambidexterity innovate quicker.

Keywords
e-government, smart cities, transformation, innovation, ambidexterity, exploration, exploitation
Authors
Ricardo Matheus, Marijn Janssen
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#563
;  Pin-Yu Chu, Hsien-Lee Tseng, Chung-Pin Lee, Wan-Ling Huang, Tong-Yi Huang, Yung-Tai Hung
ID
#563
Abstract

In recent decades, how to achieve good governance via the development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) has been a critical concern for public administrators and scholars in public administration. In addition to the improvement of ICT infrastructure, governments across the world now pay more attention to the creation of public values though ICT policies. Due to the promising nature of e-governance, it appears that identifying the factors that would help facilitate public value of information technology is extremely important. This research proposes a public value of e-governance framework with three major public values: operational, political and social values, for the development of public value and electronic governance research and national comparison. The framework requires multi-year survey data to ensure its comprehensiveness, feasibility and the continuous updating of subjective indicator data. With three years survey, we find out that the continued enhancement of e-government programs coupled with the elevation of administrative management efficiency and flexibility could lessen the time needed for policy creation and implementation. In addition, Internet might trigger e-participation, therefore government should continue to strive toward open government (including information and data disclosure) and pushing for all kinds of online citizen engagement mechanisms.

Keywords
Digital Governance, Public Value of E-Governance, longitudinal Research
Authors
Pin-Yu Chu, Hsien-Lee Tseng, Chung-Pin Lee, Wan-Ling Huang, Tong-Yi Huang, Yung-Tai Hung
Conference
ICEGOV2017
#564
;  Nuno Vasco Lopes, Delfina Sá Soares, Morten Meyerhoff Nielsen, António Tavares
ID
#564
Abstract

This paper follows the research framework for context-specific public service delivery presented at ICEGOV 2016 [1]. The research has been conducted at the UNU-EGOV unit during the last year. The paper presents the research landscape for ICT enabled public service delivery scientific and policy literature. The findings are analyzed and presented in a conceptual framework allowing us to identify the core dimensions and sub?dimensions of public service delivery.

The paper concludes by outlining the research gaps identified by the study and a series of policy recommendations to enhance public service delivery. The results showed that the Innovation and Evaluation dimensions and their sub-dimensions, Innovating Public Procurement, Collective Learning and Intelligent, Evidence-Based Policy Making and Social Media Impact are the areas with less investigation.

Keywords
Policy-Driven Electronic Governance; Context-specific Public Service Delivery; Dimensions; Research Gaps; Recommendations; Public Service
Authors
Nuno Vasco Lopes, Delfina Sá Soares, Morten Meyerhoff Nielsen, António Tavares
Conference
ICEGOV2017

Institutions

Patron
  • Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY), Government of India

 

Co-organized by
  • Digital India: National e-Governance Division (NeGD), MeitY, Government of India
  • United Nations University Operating Unit on Policy-Driven Electronic Governance (UNU-EGOV)

 

In collaboration with
  • United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

Comittees

Conference Committee

Ravi Shankar PRASAD, Minister of Law & Justice and Electronics & Information Technology, Government of India, India, Conference Chair
Maria Manuel Leitão MARQUES, Minister of the Presidency and of Administrative Modernization, Portuguese Government, Portugal, Conference Chair
Aruna SUNDARARAJAN, Ministry of Electronics & IT, India, National Steering Committee Chair
Tomasz JANOWSKI, Gda?sk University of Technology, Poland, Programme Chair
Rehema BAGUMA, Uganda Technology and Management University, Uganda, Programme Chair
Rahul DE’, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India, Programme Chair
Radha CHAUHAN, National e-Governance Division, India, Organization Chair
Delfina Sá SOARES, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal, Organization Chair
Elsa ESTEVEZ, National University of the South, Argentina, Awards Chair
Paul HECTOR, UNESCO Cairo Office, Egypt, UNESCO Liaison
Premjit LAL, National e-Governance Division, India, NeGD Liaison
Elisabete SIMÕES, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal, UNU-EGOV Liaison
Deepinder SINGH, National e-Governance Division, India, Communication Chair

 

Steering Committee

Luís Soares BARBOSA, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
John BERTOT, University of Maryland, United States
João Álvaro CARVALHO, University of Minho, Portugal
Wojciech CELLARY, Pozna? University of Economics, Poland
Radha CHAUHAN, National e-Governance Division, India
Elsa ESTEVEZ, National University of the South, Argentina
Paul HECTOR, UNESCO Cairo Office, Egypt
Tomasz JANOWSKI, Gda?sk University of Technology, Poland (Series Coordinator)
Marijn JANSSEN, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands
Theresa PARDO, Center for Technology in Government, United States
Peter PARYCEK, Danube University Krems, Austria

 

Awards Committee

Rehema BAGUMA, Uganda Technology and Management University, Uganda
Radha CHAUHAN, National e-Governance Division, India
Rahul DE’, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India
Elsa ESTEVEZ, National University of the South, Argentina (Chair)
Tomasz JANOWSKI, Gda?sk University of Technology, Poland

 

Programme Committee

Sabrine Bem ABDRABBAH, ISG Tunis, Tunisia
Ganesh ADHIKARI, Government Officer, Nepal
Chandni AGARWAL, Maharaja Agrasen Model School, India
Reshma AGARWAL, National e-Governance Division, India
Anil AGARWAL, National e-Governance Division, India
Olusegun AGBABIAKA, National eGovernment Strategies, Nigeria
Priyanshi AGRAWAL, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India
Erwin ALAMPAY, University of the Philippines, Philippines
Claudia Rodriguez ALVAREZ, Ministry of ICT, Colombia
Luis AMARAL, University of Minho, Portugal
Kim ANDREASSON, Daka advisory AB, Sweden
Sylvia ARCHMANN, Federal Chancellery of Austria, Austria
Judie ATTARD, University of Bonn, Germany
Jean-Pierre AUFFRET, Center for Advanced Technology Strategy, United States of America
Johanna AWOTWI, Centre for e-Governance, Ghana
C Jaya Sankar BABU, Pondicherry University, India
Kenneth BAGARUKAYO, Ministry of ICT, Uganda
Rehema BAGUMA, Uganda Technology and Management University, Uganda (Chair)
Aravind BALAKRISHNAN, Mobilexion Technologies Pvt. Ltd., India
Frank BANNISTER, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Luís BARBOSA, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Abhishek BEHL, Symbiosis International University, India
Mesfin BELACHEW, Ministry of Communication and Information Technology, Ethiopia
Hatem BEN STA, University of Tunis, Tunisia
Jaroslav BERCE, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Lasse BERNTZEN, HIVE, Norway
John BERTOT, University of Maryland College Park iSchool, United States of America
Radomir BOLGOV, Saint Petersburg State University, Russian Federation
Ineke BUSKENS, Research for the Future, South Africa
Luís M. CAMARINHA-MATOS, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal
Lorenzo CANTONI, Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland
João Álvaro CARVALHO, University of Minho & United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Alejandra CECHICH, Comahue University, Argentina
Wojciech CELLARY, Pozna? University of Economics and Business, Poland
Karina CENCI, National University of the South, Argentina
Ajay Singh CHAHAL, National Informatics Centre Himachal Pradesh, India
Yannis CHARALABIDIS, National Technical University Athens, Greece
Akemi Takeoka CHATFIELD, University of Wollongong, Australia
Radha CHAUHAN, National e-Governance Division, India
Jun CHENG, Beijing Information Resources Management Center, China
Carlos Ivan CHESÑEVAR, National University of the South, Argentina
Alexander CHISTYAKOV, ITMO University, Russian Federation
Sunil CHOENNI, Research and Documentation Centre (WODC), Netherlands
Shivam CHOUDHARY, Thakur College of Engineering and Technology, India
Jyoti CHOUDRIE, University of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Andrei CHUGUNOV, ITMO University, Russian Federation
Faiz Ahmed CHUNDELI, School of Planning and Architecture Vijayawada, India
Gaston CONCHA, University Bernardo O’Higgins, Chile
Meghan COOK, Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany SUNY, United States of America
Antonio CORDELLA, London School of Economics, United Kingdom
J. Ignacio CRIADO, Madrid Autonomous University, Spain
Paulo Resende DA SILVA, Évora University, Portugal
Flavio S. Correa DA SILVA, São Paulo University, Brazil
Jacob DAHLRENDTORFF, Roskilde University, Denmark
Arijit DAS, Jadavpur University, India
Rama Krushna DAS, National Informatics Centre, India
Sai DATTATHRANI, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India
Jim DAVIES, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Rahul DE’, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India (Chair)
Sangita DHAL, Delhi University, India
Gonçalo DIAS, University of Aveiro, Portugal
Dibyojit DUTTA, National Informatics Centre, India
Animesh DUTTA, NIT Durgapur, India
Yogesh DWIVEDI, Swansea University, United Kingdom
Wolfgang EBBERS, University of Twente, Netherlands
Ruben ELVIRA, IEB Business School, Spain
Elsa ESTEVEZ, National University of the South, Argentina
Ana Maria EVANS, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal
Md Gofran FAROQI, Flinders University, Australia
Enrico FERRO, Istituto Superiore Mario Boella, Italy
Olga FILATOVA, Saint Petersburg State University, Russian Federation
Pablo FILLOTTRANI, National University of the South, Argentina
Antony FRANKLIN, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, India
Saneet FULSUNDER, Sandip Institute of Technology and Research Center, India
Kuntal GANGULY, NRSC, India
Sachin GARG, George Mason University, United States of America
Arti GARG, National Informatics Centre, India
Sahu GARNESH, National Institute of Technology Allahabad, India
Kamlesh GATTANI, Wipro Limited, India
J. Ramon GIL-GARCIA, Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany SUNY, United States of America
Yiwei GONG, Wuhan University, China
Gina Paola Maestre GONGORA, North University, Colombia
Rajan GUPTA, Delhi University, India
Avni GUPTA, Ministry of Urban Development, India
Om Pradyumana GUPTA, National Informatics Centre, India
Ahsan HABIB, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Bangladesh
Roger HARRIS, Roger Harris Associates, Hong Kong SAR, China
M. Mahmudul HASAN, Harokopio University, Greece
Mathias HATAKKA, Dalarna University, Sweden
Paul HECTOR, UNESCO Cairo Office, Egypt
Carlos Arturo Merchan HERRERA, Ministry of ICT, Colombia
Vigneswara ILAVARASAN, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
Priyanka IVATURY, International Institute of Information Technology Bangalore, India
Lakshmi IYER, Christ University, India
Himanshu JAIN, International Institute of Information Technology Hyderabad, India
Tomasz JANOWSKI, Gda?sk University of Technology, Poland (Chair)
Marijn JANSSEN, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands
Mahesh Kumar JAT, MNIT Jaipur, India
Carlos JIMÉNEZ, IEEE e-Government, Spain
Saurabh JOSHI, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, India
Atreyi KANKANHALLI, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Paul KARIUKI, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Sanjeev KATARA, National Informatics Centre, India
Shadrack KATUU, IAEA, Austria
Anjali KAUSHIK, Management Development Institute, India
Jay KESAN, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States of America
Vedant KHANDELWAL, Thakur College of Science and Commerce, India
Ralf KLISCHEWSKI, German University in Cairo, Egypt
Raghuraman KOTEESWARAN, Sastra University, India
Robert KRIMMER, Tallin University of Technology, Estonia
Hiroko KUDO, Chuo University, Japan
Pankaj KULSHRESTHA, Wipro Limited, India
Arvind KUMAR, BIT MESRA, India
Dinesh KUMAR, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing Jabalpur, India
Laxman KUMARWAD, Government College of Engineering, India
Sunil Reddy KUNDURU, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India
Emmanuel LALLANA, Ideacorp, Philippines
Beatriz Barreto Brasileiro LANZA, Federal University of Paraná, Brazil
Kincho LAW, Stanford University, United States of America
Calvin LEONG, MSARG, Macau SAR, China
Nele LEOSK, European University Institute, Italy
Cintia LIMA, University of Brasília, Brazil
Galbaatar LKHAGVASUREN, Blue Banner Association, Mongolia
Rakesh LODHA, AIIMS, India
Rui Pedro LOURENÇO, University of Coimbra, Portugal
Luis F. LUNA-REYES, University at Albany SUNY, United States of America
Ann MACINTOSH, University of Leeds, United Kingdom
Ana Gabriela MAGUITMAN, National University of the South, Argentina
Debendra MAHALIK, Sambalpur University, India
Nagarajan MAHALINGAM, Government of Gujarat, India
Abhijit MAHISHI, Thakur College of Engineering and Technology, India
Charru MALHOTRA, Indian Institute of Public Administration, India
Sandeep MANGAT, Panjab University, India
Amal MARZOUKI, Laval University, Canada
Ricardo MATHEUS, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands
Ashutosh Prasad MAURYA, National Informatics Centre, India
Rony MEDAGLIA, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Albert MEIJER, Utrecth University, Netherlands
Sehl MELLOULI, Laval University, Canada
Amisha MER, B H Gardi College of Engineering and Technology, India
Jeremy MILLARD, Brunel University London, United Kingdom
Yuri MISNIKOV, University of Leeds, United Kingdom
Harekrishna MISRA, Institute of Rural Management Anand, India
Durgaprasad MISRA, National Informatics Centre, India
Carl Erik MOE, Agder University, Norway
Hrushikesha MOHANTY, University of Hyderabad, India
Maria Helena MONTEIRO, NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal
MVPRAO, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, India
Sanjay NALBALWAR, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Technological University, India
Manjit NATH, National e-Governance Division, India
Amrutaunshu NERURKAR, PricewaterhouseCoopers Pvt. Ltd., India
Niels NETTEN, Research and Documentation Centre (WODC), Netherlands
Morten Meyerhoff NIELSEN, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Agnes ODONGO, Kenya Electricity Generating Company Limited, Kenya
Adegboyega OJO, National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland
Kayode OLANIYAN, National Planning Commission, Nigeria
Syed Taha OWAIS, National Informatics Centre, India
Abhipsa PAL, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India
Neena PANDEY, Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore, India
Theresa PARDO, Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany SUNY, United States of America
Ashis Jalote PARMAR, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, India
Peter PARYCEK, Danube University Krems, Austria
Evgeny PATARAKIN, WikiVote!, Russian Federation
Karan PATHAK, DELL-EMC, India
Aditi PATHAK, Ministry of Commerce, India
Bhupinder PATHAK, National Informatics Centre, India
Manas Ranjan PATRA, Berhampur University, India
Gabriela Viale PEREIRA, Danube University Krems, Austria
Vassilios PERISTERAS, International Hellenic University, Greece
Edy PORTMANN, University of Bern, Switzerland
Lukasz PORWOL, National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland
Amit PRAKASH, International Institute of Information Technology Bangalore, India
Gabriel PURON-CID, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, Mexico
Rui QUARESMA, Évora University, Portugal
Prajith R, National Institute of Smart Governance, India
Irina RADCHENKO, ITMO University, Russian Federation
Akilur RAHMAN, National Institute of Smart Governance, India
Saravanan RAJU, University of Nebraska, United States of America
Manoranjan Pon RAM, Amity University, India
Nripendra RANA, Swansea University, United Kingdom
Sudha RAO, Ministry of Rural Development, India
Shilohu RAO, National e-Governance Division, India
Amit RAY, Shiv Nadar University, India
Barbara RE, University of Camerino, Italy
Nicolau REINHARD, University of São Paulo, Brazil
Mohamed Adel REZK, National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland
Manuella Maia RIBEIRO, Getulio Vargas Foundation, Brazil
Ana RIVOIR, University of the Republic, Uruguay
Ibrahim ROHMAN, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Christian RUPP, Austrian Government, Austria
Luis Alvarez SABUCEDO, Vigo University, Spain
A B SAGAR, Hyderabad Central University, India
Kakoli SAHA, School of Planning and Architecture Bhopal, India
Pallab SAHA, Wipro Limited, India
Tapas SAMANTA, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, India
Nisha SAMPATH, Bright Angles Consulting, India
Kandarpa Kumar SARMA, Gauhati University, India
Tino SCHUPPAN, Potsdam University, Germany
Priya SEETHARAMAN, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, India
Vijaya SEKHAR, International Institute of Information Technology Hyderabad, India
Sangeeta SEMWAL, Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology, India
Rupal SETHI, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India
Pratima SHEOREY, Symbiosis International University, India
Vashima SHUBHA, Independent e-Governance Consultant, India
Ravi SHUKLA, Centre for Culture, Media and Governance, India
Noore SIDDIQUEE, Flinders University, Australia
Parwez SIDDIQUI, Government of West Bengal, India
Jang Bahadur SINGH, Indian Institute of Management Tiruchirappalli, India
Arpit SINGHAI, National Informatics Centre, India
Eriks SNEIDERS, Stockholm University, Sweden
Delfina Sá SOARES, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Andrzej SOBCZAK, Warsaw School of Economics, Poland
Ralf-Martin SOE, Tallin University of Technology, Estonia
Henk SOL, University of Groningen, Netherlands
Sood SOOD, S M Sehgal Foundation, India
Maddalana SORRENTINO, University of Milan, Italy
Srividhya SRINIVASAN, Mohamed Sathak College of Arts and Science, India
Siddharth SRIVASTAVA, Centre for Development of Advanced Computing, India
Matthias STÜRMER, University of Bern, Switzerland
Evgeny STYRIN, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russian Federation
Efthimios TAMBOURIS, University of Macedonia, Greece
António TAVARES, University of Minho & United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Luis TERÁN, University of Fribourg, Switerzland
Louise THOMASEN, coThomasen, Denmark
Dmitrii TRUTNEV, ITMO University, Russian Federation
Hsien-Lee TSENG, Taiwan e-Governance Research Center, Taiwan (R.O.C.)
Ian TUCKER, Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy, United States of America
Hossana TWINOMURINZI, University of South Africa, South Africa
Carlos VARGAS, Tallin University, Estonia
George VARKEY, Mobilexion Technologies Pvt. Ltd., India
Linda VEIGA, University of Minho & United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Ds VENKATESH, National Informatics Centre, India
Lyudmila VIDIASOVA, ITMO University, Russian Federation
Maria WIMMER, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany
Peter WINSTANLEY, Scottish Government, Scotland
Fatemeh Ahmadi ZELETI, National University of Ireland Galway, Ireland
Jing ZHANG, Clark University, United States of America
Yingqin ZHENG, Royal Holloway University of London, United Kingdom

 

Organization Committee

Geetanjli AGRAWAL, National e-Governance Division, India
Subodh AGRAWAL, National e-Governance Division, India
Neha ANJALI, National e-Governance Division, India
Suraj ARORA, National e-Governance Division, India
Sanchita BAJAJ, National e-Governance Division, India
Manoj BHAGAT, National e-Governance Division, India
Ishan BHATKOTI, National e-Governance Division, India
Payel BHATTACHARJEE, National e-Governance Division, India
Nuno CARVALHO, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Durgaprasad DASH, National e-Governance Division, India
Ram Avtar DHAWAN, National e-Governance Division, India
Neeraj DUBEY, National e-Governance Division, India
José Luís FARIA, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Dhrubajit GOSWAMI, National e-Governance Division, India
Amit JAIN, National e-Governance Division, India
Kamal JAIN, National e-Governance Division, India
Bramhanand JHA, National e-Governance Division, India
Pranjal KALITA, National e-Governance Division, India
Anuj KAUSHAL, National e-Governance Division, India
Priyank KHARE, National e-Governance Division, India
Anuj KHERA, National e-Governance Division, India
Amit KUMAR, National e-Governance Division, India
Neeraj KUMAR, National e-Governance Division, India
Ranjan KUMAR, National e-Governance Division, India
Vibhash KUMAR, National e-Governance Division, India
Mariana LAMEIRAS, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Rajesh LOONA, National e-Governance Division, India
Morten Meyerhoff NIELSEN, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Mohit MISHRA, National e-Governance Division, India
Priyanka MONGA, National e-Governance Division, India
Ranu MOOKERJEE, National e-Governance Division, India
Barnali MUKHERJEE, National e-Governance Division, India
Rajesh NARANG, National e-Governance Division, India
Manjit NATH, National e-Governance Division, India
Debabrata NAYAK, National e-Governance Division, India
Mário PEIXOTO, United Nations University (UNU-EGOV), Portugal
Sushil PRAKASH, NISG, India
Lily PRASAD, National e-Governance Division, India
Zaara QAMAR, National e-Governance Division, India
Qamar R., National e-Governance Division, India
Arvind RAI, National e-Governance Division, India
Naveen RAJA, National e-Governance Division, India
Amit RANJAN, National e-Governance Division, India
Shilohu RAO, National e-Governance Division, India
Jai ROHILLA, National e-Governance Division, India
Amit SAVANT, National e-Governance Division, India
Shailendra SAXENA, National e-Governance Division, India
Gaj Raj SHARMA, National e-Governance Division, India
Rajesh SHARMA, National e-Governance Division, India
Ritika SHARMA, National e-Governance Division, India
Sumit SHARMA, National e-Governance Division, India
Sunil SHARMA, National e-Governance Division, India
Sagorika SHAU, National e-Governance Division, India
Kanwarjot SINGH, National e-Governance Division, India
Vinay SINGH, National e-Governance Division, India
Vishal SINGH, National e-Governance Division, India
Pravin SINHA, National e-Governance Division, India
Vishwadeep SRIVASTAVA, National e-Governance Division, India
Vinay THAKUR, National e-Governance Division, India
Rakesh TIWARI, Independent Contributor
Team IndeBo
Team MSL


Institutions